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The Theory of International Economic Sanctions: A Public Choice Approach

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  • Kaemfer, William H
  • Lowenberg, Anton D

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by American Economic Association in its journal American Economic Review.

Volume (Year): 78 (1988)
Issue (Month): 4 (September)
Pages: 786-93

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Handle: RePEc:aea:aecrev:v:78:y:1988:i:4:p:786-93

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Cited by:
  1. Dizaji, S.F. & van Bergeijk, P.A.G., 2012. "Early phase success and long run failure of economic sanctions. With an application to Iran," ISS Working Papers - General Series 544, International Institute of Social Studies of Erasmus University Rotterdam (ISS), The Hague.
  2. van Bergeijk, Peter A. G. & van Marrewijk, Charles, 1995. "Why do sanctions need time to work? Adjustment, learning and anticipation," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 12(2), pages 75-86, April.
  3. Philip Jones, 2007. "Colluding victims: A public choice analysis of international alliances," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 132(3), pages 319-332, September.
  4. Hamlin, Alan & Jennings, Colin, 2009. "Expressive Political Behaviour: Foundations, Scope and Implications," SIRE Discussion Papers 2009-41, Scottish Institute for Research in Economics (SIRE).
  5. Amanda Murdie & Dursun Peksen, 2013. "The impact of human rights INGO activities on economic sanctions," The Review of International Organizations, Springer, vol. 8(1), pages 33-53, March.
  6. Philip I. Levy, 1999. "Sanctions on South Africa: What Did They Do," Working Papers 796, Economic Growth Center, Yale University.
  7. Yongzheng Yang, 2000. "Food Embargoes against China: Their Likelihood and Potential Consequences," Asia Pacific Economic Papers 304, Australia-Japan Research Centre, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
  8. Denise Guthrie & Erick Duchesne, 2003. "(Mis)Selection Effects and Sovereignty Costs: An Alternative Measure of the Costs of Sanctions," University of Western Ontario, Economic Policy Research Institute Working Papers 20032, University of Western Ontario, Economic Policy Research Institute.
  9. Russell Sobel, 1998. "Exchange rate evidence on the effectiveness of United Nations policy," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 95(1), pages 1-25, April.
  10. Levy, P.I., 1999. "Sanctions on South Africa: What Did They Do?," Papers 796, Yale - Economic Growth Center.

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