IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Log in (now much improved!)

Citations for "Shocks, Stocks and Socks"

by Martin Browning & Thomas Crossley

For a complete description of this item, click here. For a RSS feed for citations of this item, click here.
as in new window

  1. Martin Browning & Thomas F. Crossley, 2006. "The Long-Run Cost of Job Loss as Measured by Consumption Changes," Quantitative Studies in Economics and Population Research Reports 405, McMaster University.
  2. Thomas Crossley & Hamish Low, 2004. "When Might Unemployment Insurance Matter?," Department of Economics Working Papers 2004-04, McMaster University.
  3. Martin Browning & Thomas F. Crossley & Gugliemo Weber, 2002. "Asking Consumption Questions in General Purpose Surveys," CAM Working Papers 2002-05, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics. Centre for Applied Microeconometrics.
  4. José María Casado García, 2008. "From Income to Consumption: Measuring Households Partial Insurance," Working Papers 2008-09, FEDEA.
  5. Peter J. Kuhn & Peter Kooreman & Adriaan R. Soetevent & Arie Kapteyn, 2008. "The Own and Social Effects of an Unexpected Income Shock: Evidence from the Dutch Postcode Lottery," NBER Working Papers 14035, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Orazio Attanasio & Margherita Borella, 2006. "Stochastic Components of Individual Consumption: A Time Series Analysis of Grouped Data," NBER Working Papers 12456, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Orazio Attanasio & Nicola Pavoni, 2008. "Risk Sharing in Private Information Models with Asset Accumulation: Explaining the Excess Smoothness of Consumption," Carlo Alberto Notebooks 103, Collegio Carlo Alberto.
  8. Richard Blundell & Luigi Pistaferri & Ian Preston, 2002. "Partial insurance, information and consumption dynamics," IFS Working Papers W02/16, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  9. Thomas F. Crossley & Hamish W. Low, 2014. "Job Loss, Credit Constraints, and Consumption Growth," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 96(5), pages 876-884, December.
  10. Peter Kuhn & Peter Kooreman & Adriaan Soetevent & Arie Kapteyn, 2011. "The Effects of Lottery Prizes on Winners and Their Neighbors: Evidence from the Dutch Postcode Lottery," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(5), pages 2226-47, August.
  11. Benjamin J. Keys, 2010. "The credit market consequences of job displacement," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2010-24, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  12. Timothy K.M. Beatty & Laura Blow & Thomas F. Crossley, 2011. "Is There a Heat or Eat Trade-off in the UK?," Koç University-TUSIAD Economic Research Forum Working Papers 1133, Koc University-TUSIAD Economic Research Forum.
  13. Burcu Duygan, 2005. "Aggregate Shocks, Idiosyncratic Risk, and Durable Goods Purchases: Evidence from Turkeys 1994 Financial Crisis," 2005 Meeting Papers 594, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  14. Michael D. Hurd & Susann Rohwedder, 2011. "The Effects of the Financial Crisis on Actual and Anticipated Consumption," Working Papers wp255, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center.
  15. Stephen H. Shore & Todd Sinai, 2005. "Commitment, Risk, and Consumption: Do Birds of a Feather Have Bigger Nests?," NBER Working Papers 11588, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  16. Cristina Barceló & Ernesto Villanueva, 2010. "The response of household wealth to the risk of losing the job: evidence from differences in firing costs," Working Papers 1002, Banco de España;Working Papers Homepage.
  17. Qiang Zhang & Sung Jin Kang, 2007. "Crisis and Consumption Smoothing," Annals of Economics and Finance, Society for AEF, vol. 8(1), pages 137-154, May.
  18. Pushan Dutt & V. Padmanabhan, 2011. "Crisis and Consumption Smoothing," Marketing Science, INFORMS, vol. 30(3), pages 491-512, 05-06.
  19. Raj Chetty, 2004. "Optimal Unemployment Insurance When Income Effects are Large," NBER Working Papers 10500, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.