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Citations for "Does European Unemployment Prop Up American Wages?"

by Donald R. Davis

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  1. Donald R. Davis & Trevor A. Reeve, 2000. "Human capital, unemployment, and relative wages in a global economy," International Finance Discussion Papers 659, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  2. Donald R. Davis, 1996. "Technology, Unemployment, and Relative Wages in a Global Economy," NBER Working Papers 5636, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Devashish Mitra & Priya Ranjan, 2007. "Offshoring and Unemployment," Working Papers 060719, University of California-Irvine, Department of Economics.
  4. Bas Jacobs, 2003. "The lost race between schooling and technology," CPB Discussion Paper 25, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
  5. Wilhelm Kohler, 2002. "Issues of US-EU Trade Policy," Economics working papers 2002_03, Department of Economics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria.
  6. Ben J. Heijdra & Christian Keuschnigg & Wilhelm Kohler, 2001. "Eastern enlargement of the EU: Jobs, investment and welfare in present member countries," Economics working papers 2001-11, Department of Economics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria.
  7. repec:ilo:ilowps:365055 is not listed on IDEAS
  8. Singh, Ajit & Zammit, Ann, 2011. "Globalisation, labour Standards and economic Development," MPRA Paper 53096, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  9. Rod Tyers & William Coleman, 2005. "Beyond Brigden: Australia’s Pre-War Manufacturing Tariffs, Real Wages and Economic Size," ANU Working Papers in Economics and Econometrics 2005-456, Australian National University, College of Business and Economics, School of Economics.
  10. Robert C. Feenstra, 1998. "Integration of Trade and Disintegration of Production in the Global Economy," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 12(4), pages 31-50, Fall.
  11. Kurt Kratena, 2006. "International Outsourcing and Labour with Sector-specific Human Capital," WIFO Working Papers 272, WIFO.
  12. Davidson, Carl & Martin, Lawrence & Matusz, Steven, 1999. "Trade and search generated unemployment," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 48(2), pages 271-299, August.
  13. Gustavo Gonzaga & Beatriz Muriel & Cristina Terra, 2005. "Abertura Comercial, Desigualdade Salarial E Sindicalização," Anais do XXXIII Encontro Nacional de Economia [Proceedings of the 33th Brazilian Economics Meeting] 073, ANPEC - Associação Nacional dos Centros de Pósgraduação em Economia [Brazilian Association of Graduate Programs in Economics].
  14. Robert Stehrer, 2004. "Can Trade Explain the Sector Bias of Skill-biased Technical Change?," wiiw Working Papers 30, The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies, wiiw.
  15. Guido G. Porto, 2008. "Agro-Manufactured Export Prices, Wages and Unemployment," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 90(3), pages 748-764.
  16. Ngo Van Long & Raymond Riezman & Antoine Soubeyran, 2003. "Trade, Wage Gaps, and Specific Human Capital Accumulation," CESifo Working Paper Series 911, CESifo Group Munich.
  17. Robbins, Donald J., 2003. "The impact of trade liberalization upon inequality in developing countries : a review of theory and evidence," ILO Working Papers 993650553402676, International Labour Organization.
  18. Jean, Sebastien, 2000. "The Effect of International Trade on Labor-Demand Elasticities: Intersectoral Matters," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 8(3), pages 504-16, August.
  19. Matthias Weiss, 2004. "Employment Effects of Skill Biased Technological Change when Benefits are Linked to Per-Capita Income," MEA discussion paper series 04043, Munich Center for the Economics of Aging (MEA) at the Max Planck Institute for Social Law and Social Policy.
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