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Affective Decision Making in Insurance Markets

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  • Anat Bracha

Abstract

This paper suggests incorporating affective considerations into decision making theory and insurance decision in particular. I describe a decision maker with two internal accounts - the rational account and the mental account. The rational account decides on insurance to maximize expected (perceived) utility, while the mental account chooses risk perceptions which then affect the perceived expected utility. The two accounts interact to reach a decision which is composed of both risk perception and insurance level. The model is based on psychology research and shows interesting results for the insurance markets. Also, this framework helps to distinguish between report and choice tasks.

Suggested Citation

  • Anat Bracha, 2004. "Affective Decision Making in Insurance Markets," Yale School of Management Working Papers amz2665, Yale School of Management, revised 01 Sep 2004.
  • Handle: RePEc:ysm:somwrk:amz2665
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    File URL: http://icfpub.som.yale.edu/publications/2665
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Alarie, Yves & Dionne, Georges, 2001. "Lottery Decisions and Probability Weighting Function," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 22(1), pages 21-33, January.
    2. Kahneman, Daniel & Tversky, Amos, 1979. "Prospect Theory: An Analysis of Decision under Risk," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 47(2), pages 263-291, March.
    3. Grether, David M & Plott, Charles R, 1979. "Economic Theory of Choice and the Preference Reversal Phenomenon," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 69(4), pages 623-638, September.
    4. Daniel Kahneman, 2003. "Maps of Bounded Rationality: Psychology for Behavioral Economics," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(5), pages 1449-1475, December.
    5. Tomas Philipson & John Cawley, 1999. "An Empirical Examination of Information Barriers to Trade in Insurance," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(4), pages 827-846, September.
    6. Akerlof, George A & Dickens, William T, 1982. "The Economic Consequences of Cognitive Dissonance," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 72(3), pages 307-319, June.
    7. Joseph Eisenhauer, 1997. "Risk aversion, wealth, and the DARA hypothesis: A new test," International Advances in Economic Research, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 3(1), pages 46-53, February.
    8. Leeat Yariv, 2001. "Believe and Let Believe: Axiomatic Foundations for Belief Dependent Utility Functionals," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 1344, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University.
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    Cited by:

    1. Salmon, Timothy C. & Iachini, Michael, 2007. "Continuous ascending vs. pooled multiple unit auctions," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 61(1), pages 67-85, October.
    2. Anat Bracha, 2004. "Consistency and Refutability of Affective Choice," Yale School of Management Working Papers amz2639, Yale School of Management.
    3. Landeo, Claudia M., 2009. "Cognitive coherence and tort reform," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 30(6), pages 898-912, December.
    4. Heifetz Aviad & Minelli Enrico, 2015. "Aspiration Traps," The B.E. Journal of Theoretical Economics, De Gruyter, vol. 15(2), pages 125-142, July.
    5. Landeo, Claudia M., 2009. "Tort Reform, Disputes and Belief Formation," MPRA Paper 13453, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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