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"Nudging" Risky Decision-Making: A Note on the Causal Influence of Information Order

Author

Listed:
  • Jason A. Aimone
  • Sheryl Ball
  • Brooks King-Casas

Abstract

Recent studies have suggested that there may be a correlation between the order in which decision-makers collect information about risky gambles and their tendency to make expected value maximizing decisions. In this work we present results from an experiment designed to establish causality by exogenously manipulating the order in which participants view information about probabilities and payoffs. We find that there is a relationship between information presentation and the amount of risk participants take. This suggests that the choice architecture for real world risky decision making may have both intended and unintended consequences.

Suggested Citation

  • Jason A. Aimone & Sheryl Ball & Brooks King-Casas, 2016. ""Nudging" Risky Decision-Making: A Note on the Causal Influence of Information Order," Working Papers e07-52, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:vpi:wpaper:e07-52
    as

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    File URL: ftp://repec.econ.vt.edu/Papers/Ball/Nudging_Risk_Preferences.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2016
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Elena Reutskaja & Rosemarie Nagel & Colin F. Camerer & Antonio Rangel, 2011. "Search Dynamics in Consumer Choice under Time Pressure: An Eye-Tracking Study," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(2), pages 900-926, April.
    2. Tibor Besedes & Cary Deck & Sudipta Sarangi & Mikhael Shor, 2015. "Reducing Choice Overload without Reducing Choices," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 97(4), pages 793-802, October.
    3. Amos Arieli & Yaniv Ben-Ami & Ariel Rubinstein, 2011. "Tracking Decision Makers under Uncertainty," American Economic Journal: Microeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 3(4), pages 68-76, November.
    4. repec:tpr:restat:v:97:y:2015:i:5:p:793-802 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Judd B. Kessler & Alvin E. Roth, 2012. "Organ Allocation Policy and the Decision to Donate," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 102(5), pages 2018-2047, August.
    6. Catherine C. Eckel & Philip J. Grossman, 2008. "Forecasting Risk Attitudes: An Experimental Study Using Actual and Forecast Gamble Choices," Monash Economics Working Papers archive-01, Monash University, Department of Economics.
    7. David H. Howard, 2007. "Producing Organ Donors," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 21(3), pages 25-36, Summer.
    8. Charles A. Holt & Susan K. Laury, 2002. "Risk Aversion and Incentive Effects," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(5), pages 1644-1655, December.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Risky Decision Making; Expected Value Maximization; Nudging;

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