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Re-Examining the Impact of Housing Wealth and Stock Wealth on Household Spending: Does Persistence in Wealth Changes Matter?

  • Richard A. Ashley
  • Guo Li
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    Case, Quigley and Shiller (2013) distinguished and quantified two wealth effects in retail sales at the state level: One from wealth held as corporate stock and one from wealth held in the form of home ownership. Here we investigate how each of these wealth e¤ects varies by frequency that is, over different levels of persistence in the wealth fluctuations. Using the Case, Quigley and Shiller state-level panel data over the period from 1975Q1 to 2012Q2, and separately modeling the financial crisis period of 2008Q1 onward, we estimate a dynamic fixed- effects model for retail sales, allowing for endogeneity in both wealth variables. We find that the quarterly growth rate of state-level retail sales responds differently to fluctuations in these two wealth variables at different persistent levels. In particular, retail sales respond more intensely to highly-persistent fluctuations in stock wealth, and respond more strongly to less-persistent (more transitory) fluctuations in housing wealth.

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    Paper provided by Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number e07-39.

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    Length: 34 pages
    Date of creation: 2013
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:vpi:wpaper:e07-39
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