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International environmental agreements under endogenous uncertainty

Author

Listed:
  • Bruno Nkuiya
  • Walid Marrouch
  • Eric Bahel

Abstract

This paper explores the implications of the possibility of a shift in environmental damages on the participation in environmental treaties. Using a two-period model where the probability of a regime shift increases with the first-period emissions, we examine the issue of coalition formation under both fixed and dynamic membership. Our analysis suggests that endogenous uncertainty may increase participation. Moreover, we find that full cooperation may be sustained, but only in the presence of endogenous uncertainty. Interestingly, when the shift in the environmental damage is large enough, the model provides a way to solve the "puzzle of small coalitions" found in the literature related to International Environmental Agreements (IEAs).

Suggested Citation

  • Bruno Nkuiya & Walid Marrouch & Eric Bahel, 2011. "International environmental agreements under endogenous uncertainty," Working Papers e07-32, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:vpi:wpaper:e07-32
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Barrett, Scott, 1994. "Self-Enforcing International Environmental Agreements," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 46(0), pages 878-894, Supplemen.
    2. Boucher, Vincent & Bramoullé, Yann, 2010. "Providing global public goods under uncertainty," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 94(9-10), pages 591-603, October.
    3. Michael Hoel & Kerstin Schneider, 1997. "Incentives to participate in an international environmental agreement," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 9(2), pages 153-170, March.
    4. de Zeeuw, Aart & Zemel, Amos, 2012. "Regime shifts and uncertainty in pollution control," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 36(7), pages 939-950.
    5. Santiago J. Rubio & Alistair Ulph, 2006. "Self-enforcing international environmental agreements revisited," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 58(2), pages 233-263, April.
    6. Rubio, S. & Ulph, A., 2002. "A simple dynamic model of international environmental agreements with a stock pollutant," Discussion Paper Series In Economics And Econometrics 209, Economics Division, School of Social Sciences, University of Southampton.
    7. Rubio, Santiago J. & Ulph, Alistair, 2007. "An infinite-horizon model of dynamic membership of international environmental agreements," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 54(3), pages 296-310, November.
    8. Bruno Nkuiya, 2011. "International Emission Strategies under the Threat of a Sudden Jump in Damages," Cahiers de recherche CREATE 2011-1, CREATE.
    9. Santiago Rubio & Begoña Casino, 2005. "Self-enforcing international environmental agreements with a stock pollutant," Spanish Economic Review, Springer;Spanish Economic Association, vol. 7(2), pages 89-109, June.
    10. Alistair Ulph, 2004. "Stable International Environmental Agreements with a Stock Pollutant, Uncertainty and Learning," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 29(1), pages 53-73, July.
    11. Tsur, Yacov & Zemel, Amos, 1998. "Pollution control in an uncertain environment," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 22(6), pages 967-975, June.
    12. Carraro, Carlo & Siniscalco, Domenico, 1993. "Strategies for the international protection of the environment," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(3), pages 309-328, October.
    13. Bruno Nkuiya, 2012. "The Effects of the Length of the Period of Commitment on the Size of State International Environmental Agreements," Cahiers de recherche CREATE 2012-7, CREATE.
    14. Dockner Engelbert J. & Van Long Ngo, 1993. "International Pollution Control: Cooperative versus Noncooperative Strategies," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 25(1), pages 13-29, July.
    15. Bruno Nkuiya, 2012. "The Effects of the Length of the Period of Commitment on the Size of Stable International Environmental Agreements," Dynamic Games and Applications, Springer, vol. 2(4), pages 411-430, December.
    16. Clarke, Harry R. & Reed, William J., 1994. "Consumption/pollution tradeoffs in an environment vulnerable to pollution-related catastrophic collapse," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 18(5), pages 991-1010, September.
    17. Rubio, S. J. & Ulph, A., 2002. "An infinite-horizon model of dynamic membership of international environmental agreements," Discussion Paper Series In Economics And Econometrics 0210, Economics Division, School of Social Sciences, University of Southampton.
    18. Rubio, S. & Ulph, A., 2002. "A simple dynamic model of international environmental agreements with a stock pollutant," Discussion Paper Series In Economics And Econometrics 0209, Economics Division, School of Social Sciences, University of Southampton.
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    Cited by:

    1. Adam N. Walker & Hans-Peter Weikard & Andries Richter, 2015. "The Rise and Fall of the Great Fish Pact under Endogenous Risk of Stock Collapse," Working Papers 2015.60, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
    2. Lazkano, Itziar & Marrouch, Walid & Nkuiya, Bruno, 2016. "Adaptation to climate change: how does heterogeneity in adaptation costs affect climate coalitions?," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 21(06), pages 812-838, December.
    3. Bruno Nkuiya, 2012. "The Effects of the Length of the Period of Commitment on the Size of Stable International Environmental Agreements," Dynamic Games and Applications, Springer, vol. 2(4), pages 411-430, December.
    4. Miller, Steve & Nkuiya, Bruno, 2016. "Coalition formation in fisheries with potential regime shift," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 79(C), pages 189-207.
    5. Nkuiya, Bruno & Costello, Christopher, 2016. "Pollution control under a possible future shift in environmental preferences," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 132(PB), pages 193-205.
    6. repec:gam:jgames:v:8:y:2017:i:3:p:30-:d:104982 is not listed on IDEAS

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    Keywords

    International Environmental Agreements; Endogenous Uncertainty; Emissions; Shift in Damage.;

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