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Frequency Dependence in a Real-Time Monetary Policy Rule

Author

Listed:
  • Richard Ashley
  • Kwok Ping Tsang
  • Randal J. Verbrugge

Abstract

We estimate a monetary policy rule allowing for possible frequency dependence - i.e. allowing the central bank to respond di¤erently to persistent innovations than to transitory innovations, in both the real-time unemployment rate and the real-time inflation rate. The method is flexible, and requires no strong a priori assumptions on the pattern of frequency dependence or on the nature of the data-generating process. The data convincingly reject linearity in the monetary policy rule, in the direction suggested by theory. Our two major …ndings are 1) the post-Volcker central bank responds more strongly to unemployment rate fluctuations than previous regimes do and 2) while the post-Volcker central bank reacts more strongly to persistent inflation fluctuations, it actually accommodates inflation at higher frequencies.

Suggested Citation

  • Richard Ashley & Kwok Ping Tsang & Randal J. Verbrugge, 2010. "Frequency Dependence in a Real-Time Monetary Policy Rule," Working Papers e07-21, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:vpi:wpaper:e07-21
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    File URL: ftp://repec.econ.vt.edu/Papers/Tsang/draft_0127.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Timothy Cogley & Riccardo Colacito & Thomas J. Sargent, 2007. "Benefits from U.S. Monetary Policy Experimentation in the Days of Samuelson and Solow and Lucas," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 39(s1), pages 67-99, February.
    2. Margaret M. McConnell & Gabriel Perez-Quiros, 2000. "Output fluctuations in the United States: what has changed since the early 1980s?," Proceedings, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, issue Mar.
    3. Richard A. Ashley & Randall J. Verbrugge., 2006. "Mis-Specification in Phillips Curve Regressions: Quantifying Frequency Dependence in This Relationship While Allowing for Feedback," Working Papers e06-11, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Department of Economics.
    4. Richard A. Ashley. & Randall J. Verbrugge., 2006. "Mis-Specification and Frequency Dependence in a New Keynesian Phillips Curve," Working Papers e06-12, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Department of Economics.
    5. Richard Ashley & Randal Verbrugge, 2009. "Frequency Dependence in Regression Model Coefficients: An Alternative Approach for Modeling Nonlinear Dynamic Relationships in Time Series," Econometric Reviews, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 28(1-3), pages 4-20.
    6. Konrad Podczeck, 2010. "On existence of rich Fubini extensions," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 45(1), pages 1-22, October.
    7. Sun, Yeneng, 2006. "The exact law of large numbers via Fubini extension and characterization of insurable risks," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 126(1), pages 31-69, January.
    8. Rudebusch, Glenn D., 2002. "Term structure evidence on interest rate smoothing and monetary policy inertia," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(6), pages 1161-1187, September.
    9. Harald Uhlig, 1996. "A law of large numbers for large economies (*)," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 8(1), pages 41-50.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Richard A. Ashley & Christopher F. Parmeter, 2013. "Sensitivity Analysis For Inference In 2SLS Estimation With Possibly-Flawes Instruments," Working Papers e07-38, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Department of Economics.
    2. Ciner, Cetin, 2015. "Are equities good inflation hedges? A frequency domain perspective," Review of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(C), pages 12-17.
    3. Luís Francisco Aguiar-Conraria & Manuel M. F. Martins & Maria Joana Soares, "undated". "Analyzing the Taylor Rule with Wavelet Lenses," NIPE Working Papers 18/2014, NIPE - Universidade do Minho.
    4. Ashley, Richard & Li, Guo, 2014. "Re-examining the impact of housing wealth and stock wealth on retail sales: Does persistence in wealth changes matter?," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(C), pages 109-118.
    5. Luís Aguiar-Conraria & Manuel M. F. Martins & Maria Joana Soares, 2016. "Estimating the Taylor Rule in the Time-Frequency Domain," CEF.UP Working Papers 1404, Universidade do Porto, Faculdade de Economia do Porto.
    6. Richard A. Ashley & Kwok Ping Tsang, 2013. "International Evidence On The Oil Price-Real Output Relationship: Does Persistence Matter?," Working Papers e07-42, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Department of Economics.
    7. Ashley, Richard & Verbrugge, Randal, 2015. "Persistence Dependence in Empirical Relations: The Velocity of Money," Working Paper 1530, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
    8. Richard A. Ashley & Kwok Ping Tsang, 2014. "Credible Granger-Causality Inference with Modest Sample Lengths: A Cross-Sample Validation Approach," Econometrics, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 2(1), pages 1-20, March.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Taylor rule; frequency dependence; spectral regression; real-time data;

    JEL classification:

    • C22 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes
    • C32 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes; State Space Models
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy

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