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The gender wage gap in top corporate jobs is still there

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Abstract

We investigate the gender wage gap in top corporate jobs for the years 2000 till 2004. Using data from the OSIRIS database, we ¯nd that female managers receive 24.0 percent less in total compensation (salary, bonuses, other payments and exer- cised stock options) than their male colleagues. When we control for personal, ¯rm and industry characteristics, this di®erence reduces to 15.9 percent. Controlling for occupational segregation, i.e. \glass ceiling", reduces the di®erence to 6.0 percent. Additional results that fully consider the role of stock option indicate a 9.0 to 12.1 percent di®erence. These results suggest that the main sources of the gender wage gap in top corporate jobs are occupational segregation and a di®erent endowment of male and female managers with stock options.

Suggested Citation

  • B. Burcin Yurtoglu & Christine Zulehner, 2007. "The gender wage gap in top corporate jobs is still there," Vienna Economics Papers 0701, University of Vienna, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:vie:viennp:0701
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    Cited by:

    1. Amanda L. Coxbill & Lee W. Sanning & Sherrill Shaffer, 2009. "Market Reaction To The Announcement Of A Male-To-Female Ceo Turnover," CAMA Working Papers 2009-13, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
    2. Nina Smith & Valdemar Smith & Mette Verne, 2011. "The gender pay gap in top corporate jobs in Denmark: Glass ceilings, sticky floors or both?," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 32(2), pages 156-177, May.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • G3 - Financial Economics - - Corporate Finance and Governance

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