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The effects of Chinese import penetration on firm innovation: Evidence from the Vietnamese manufacturing sector

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  • Duc Anh Dang

Abstract

This paper evaluates the impact of Chinese import penetration on the innovation of Vietnamese manufacturing firms from 2011 to 2015, exploiting variations in import exposure by industry specialization and instrumenting for Chinese import penetration using Chinese global exports. Contrary to the existing literature, the paper finds no systematic evidence that rising imports from China make domestic firms adopt new technologies or innovations in their products.

Suggested Citation

  • Duc Anh Dang, 2017. "The effects of Chinese import penetration on firm innovation: Evidence from the Vietnamese manufacturing sector," WIDER Working Paper Series 077, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  • Handle: RePEc:unu:wpaper:wp2017-77
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    1. Nicholas Bloom & Mirko Draca & John Van Reenen, 2016. "Trade Induced Technical Change? The Impact of Chinese Imports on Innovation, IT and Productivity," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 83(1), pages 87-117.
    2. Matteo Bugamelli & Silvia Fabiani & Enrico Sette, 2015. "The Age of the Dragon: The Effect of Imports from China on Firmā€Level Prices," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 47(6), pages 1091-1118, September.
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    5. Lawrence Edwards & Rhys Jenkins, 2015. "The Impact of Chinese Import Penetration on the South African Manufacturing Sector," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 51(4), pages 447-463, April.
    6. Tinh Doan & Son Nguyen & Huong Vu & Tuyen Tran & Steven Lim, 2016. "Does rising import competition harm local firm productivity in less advanced economies? Evidence from the Vietnam's manufacturing sector," The Journal of International Trade & Economic Development, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 25(1), pages 23-46, February.
    7. Avraham Ebenstein & Ann Harrison & Margaret McMillan & Shannon Phillips, 2014. "Estimating the Impact of Trade and Offshoring on American Workers using the Current Population Surveys," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 96(4), pages 581-595, October.
    8. Bernard, Andrew B. & Jensen, J. Bradford & Schott, Peter K., 2006. "Survival of the best fit: Exposure to low-wage countries and the (uneven) growth of U.S. manufacturing plants," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(1), pages 219-237, January.
    9. Hale Utar, 2014. "When the Floodgates Open: "Northern" Firms' Response to Removal of Trade Quotas on Chinese Goods," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 6(4), pages 226-250, October.
    10. Douglas Staiger & James H. Stock, 1997. "Instrumental Variables Regression with Weak Instruments," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 65(3), pages 557-586, May.
    11. Tinh Doan & Son Nguyen & Tuyen Tran & Huong Vu & Steven Lim, 2014. "Does Rising Import Competition Harm Local Firm Productivity in Less Advanced Economies? Evidence from Vietnam's Manufacturing Sector," Working Papers in Economics 14/09, University of Waikato.
    12. Martin, Julien & Mejean, Isabelle, 2014. "Low-wage country competition and the quality content of high-wage country exports," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 93(1), pages 140-152.
    13. Damoun Ashournia & Jakob Munch & Daniel Nguyen, 2014. "The Impact of Chinese Import Penetration on Danish Firms and Workers," Economics Series Working Papers 703, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
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