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Reducing early pregnancy in low-income countries: A literature review and new evidence

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  • Lars Ivar Oppedal Berge
  • Kjetil Bjorvatn
  • Amina Mohamed Maalim
  • Vincent Somville
  • Bertil Tungodden

Abstract

Many adolescent girls in low-income countries face the challenge of early pregnancy and lifelong dependence upon family and partners. In this paper, we review the literature on field interventions aimed at reducing early pregnancies in low-income countries and report from a randomized control trial in rural Tanzania. From an analysis of more than 3,000 essays written by adolescent girls about their hopes for the future, we find that health training and entrepreneurship training affect two key mechanisms determining early pregnancy, namely internal locus of control and economic opportunity.

Suggested Citation

  • Lars Ivar Oppedal Berge & Kjetil Bjorvatn & Amina Mohamed Maalim & Vincent Somville & Bertil Tungodden, 2017. "Reducing early pregnancy in low-income countries: A literature review and new evidence," WIDER Working Paper Series 133, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  • Handle: RePEc:unu:wpaper:wp2017-133
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    2. Esther Duflo & Pascaline Dupas & Michael Kremer, 2015. "Education, HIV, and Early Fertility: Experimental Evidence from Kenya," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 105(9), pages 2757-2797, September.
    3. Robert Jensen, 2012. "Do Labor Market Opportunities Affect Young Women's Work and Family Decisions? Experimental Evidence from India," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 127(2), pages 753-792.
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    5. Alam, Andaleeb & Baez, Javier E. & V. Del Carpio, Ximena, 2011. "Does cash for school influence young women's behavior in the longer term ? evidence from Pakistan," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5669, The World Bank.
    6. Grant Miller, 2010. "Contraception as Development? New Evidence from Family Planning in Colombia," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 120(545), pages 709-736, June.
    7. Sarah Baird & Ephraim Chirwa & Craig McIntosh & Berk Özler, 2010. "The short‐term impacts of a schooling conditional cash transfer program on the sexual behavior of young women," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(S1), pages 55-68, September.
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    9. Rasul, Imran, 2008. "Household bargaining over fertility: Theory and evidence from Malaysia," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 86(2), pages 215-241, June.
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    12. Gallant, Melanie & Maticka-Tyndale, Eleanor, 2004. "School-based HIV prevention programmes for African youth," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 58(7), pages 1337-1351, April.
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    Cited by:

    1. Jean-Philippe Platteau & Guilia Camilotti & Emmanuelle Auriol, 2017. "Eradicating women-hurting customs: What role for social engineering?," WIDER Working Paper Series 145, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).

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