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Political role models, child marriage, and women’s autonomy over marriage in India

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  • Martin Hearson

Abstract

Qualitative case studies suggest that the outcomes of tax treaty negotiations are determined by power politics and negotiating capability. In contrast, quantitative studies have tended to depart from a model that implies absolute gains, full rationality, and perfect information on the part of both treaty signatories. This paper bridges the gap by replicating two existing quantitative studies, introducing new, more sophisticated data. New fiscal data are drawn from the ICTD Government Revenue Dataset, while treaty content is measured using the ActionAid Tax Treaties Dataset. It finds that developing countries that raise more corporate income tax are more likely to sign tax treaties with wealthier countries, and more likely to negotiate higher withholding tax rates in those treaties, but not more likely to obtain a better negotiated result overall. In contrast, developing countries that raise more revenue in total are more likely to negotiate better outcomes in other clauses of the treaty that are more obscure and technically complex. There is also a strong learning effect, with better outcomes across the board as a developing country gains experience of signing tax treaties. Finally, greater asymmetries in investment stocks and material capabilities lead to worse outcomes for developing countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Martin Hearson, 2017. "Political role models, child marriage, and women’s autonomy over marriage in India," WIDER Working Paper Series 122, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  • Handle: RePEc:unu:wpaper:wp2017-122
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    1. Ronald B. Davies & Pehr-Johan Norbäck & Ayça Tekin-Koru, 2009. "The Effect of Tax Treaties on Multinational Firms: New Evidence from Microdata," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 32(1), pages 77-110, January.
    2. Chisik, Richard & Davies, Ronald B., 2004. "Asymmetric FDI and tax-treaty bargaining: theory and evidence," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(6), pages 1119-1148, June.
    3. Ronald B. Davies, 2004. "Tax Treaties and Foreign Direct Investment: Potential versus Performance," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 11(6), pages 775-802, November.
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    5. Bruce A. Blonigen & Lindsay Oldenski & Nicholas Sly, 2014. "The Differential Effects of Bilateral Tax Treaties," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 6(2), pages 1-18, May.
    6. Hearson, Martin, 2016. "Measuring tax treaty negotiation outcomes: the Actionaid tax treaties dataset," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 67869, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    7. Prichard, Wilson & Cobham, Alex & Goodall, Andrew, 2014. "The ICTD Government Revenue Dataset," Working Papers 10250, Institute of Development Studies, International Centre for Tax and Development.
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    10. Hearson, Martin, 2015. "Tax treaties in sub-Saharan Africa: a critical review," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 67903, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    11. Hearson, Martin, 2016. "Measuring Tax Treaty Negotiation Outcomes: the ActionAid Tax Treaties Dataset," Working Papers 11206, Institute of Development Studies, International Centre for Tax and Development.
    12. Peter Egger & Mario Larch & Michael Pfaffermayr & Hannes Winner, 2006. "The impact of endogenous tax treaties on foreign direct investment: theory and evidence," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 39(3), pages 901-931, August.
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    14. Thomas Rixen & Peter Schwarz, 2009. "Bargaining over the Avoidance of Double Taxation: Evidence from German Tax Treaties," FinanzArchiv: Public Finance Analysis, Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen, vol. 65(4), pages 442-471, December.
    15. Eric Neumayer, 2007. "Do double taxation treaties increase foreign direct investment to developing countries?," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(8), pages 1501-1519.
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