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Poverty trends in Pakistan

Author

Listed:
  • Hina Nazli
  • Edward Whitney
  • Kristi Mahrt

Abstract

The official estimates of poverty in Pakistan have shown a remarkable and consistent decline in the poverty headcount during the previous decade. This paper examines trends in poverty between 2001 and 2011 using the official food energy intake and the cost of basic needs approaches, both of which are modified to allow poverty lines to vary over time and space. The latter estimates provide utility-consistent poverty lines through the imposition of revealed preference conditions in maximum entropy adjustments. Evidence from both methods suggests that poverty incidence increased rather than declined as indicated in the official estimates.

Suggested Citation

  • Hina Nazli & Edward Whitney & Kristi Mahrt, 2015. "Poverty trends in Pakistan," WIDER Working Paper Series 136, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  • Handle: RePEc:unu:wpaper:wp2015-136
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    File URL: https://www.wider.unu.edu/sites/default/files/WP2015-136.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Mukherjee, Sanjukta & Benson, Todd, 2003. "The Determinants of Poverty in Malawi, 1998," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 31(2), pages 339-358, February.
    2. S.M. Naseem, 1973. "Mass Poverty in Pakistan. Some Preliminary Findings," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 12(4), pages 317-360.
    3. Martin Ravallion & Michael Lokshin, 2006. "Testing Poverty Lines," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 52(3), pages 399-421, September.
    4. Ulrik Beck & Karl Pauw Author-Name:Richard Mussa, 2015. "Methods matter: The sensitivity of Malawian poverty estimates to definitions,data, and assumptions," WIDER Working Paper Series 126, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    5. Quentin Wodon, 1997. "Food energy intake and cost of basic needs: Measuring poverty in Bangladesh," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(2), pages 66-101.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Ulrik Beck, 2015. "Keep it real: Measuring real inequality using survey data from developing countries," WIDER Working Paper Series 133, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    2. Channing Arndt & Kristi Mahrt & Finn Tarp, 2016. "Absolute poverty lines," WIDER Working Paper Series 008, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    3. repec:spr:qualqt:v:52:y:2018:i:6:d:10.1007_s11135-018-0710-0 is not listed on IDEAS

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