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Children and the youth in rural Viet Nam

Author

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  • Narciso Gaia
  • Newman Carol

Abstract

Structural transformation in rural Viet Nam has led to rising incomes and a diversification of livelihoods away from agriculture. Using panel data on children in 2,181 rural households surveyed over the 2008-14 period, we examine how the welfare of children has been impacted by structural transformation. Our analysis depicts a society that has made great progress towards improving child welfare which can in part be linked to the empowerment of women that has accompanied the transformation process. We find heterogeneity in welfare gains though, with boys benefitting more than girls and persistently lower levels of child welfare among ethnic minorities.

Suggested Citation

  • Narciso Gaia & Newman Carol, 2015. "Children and the youth in rural Viet Nam," WIDER Working Paper Series 090, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  • Handle: RePEc:unu:wpaper:wp2015-090
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    File URL: https://www.wider.unu.edu/sites/default/files/wp2015-090.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Owen O'Donnell & Furio C. Rosati & Eddy van Doorslaer, 2005. "Health effects of child work: Evidence from rural Vietnam," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 18(3), pages 437-467, September.
    2. Basu, Kaushik & Das, Sanghamitra & Dutta, Bhaskar, 2010. "Child labor and household wealth: Theory and empirical evidence of an inverted-U," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 91(1), pages 8-14, January.
    3. Kathleen Beegle & Rajeev Dehejia & Roberta Gatti, 2009. "Why Should We Care About Child Labor?: The Education, Labor Market, and Health Consequences of Child Labor," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 44(4).
    4. Nancy Qian, 2008. "Missing Women and the Price of Tea in China: The Effect of Sex-Specific Earnings on Sex Imbalance," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 123(3), pages 1251-1285.
    5. Eric V. Edmonds, 2005. "Does Child Labor Decline with Improving Economic Status?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 40(1).
    6. Mark M. Pitt & Shahidur R. Khandker, 1998. "The Impact of Group-Based Credit Programs on Poor Households in Bangladesh: Does the Gender of Participants Matter?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 106(5), pages 958-996, October.
    7. Newman Carol, 2015. "Gender inequality and the empowerment of women in rural Viet Nam," WIDER Working Paper Series 066, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
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