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The growth-employment-poverty nexus in Latin America in the 2000s: Ecuador country study

Listed author(s):
  • Cruces Guillermo
  • Fields Gary S.
  • Jaume David
  • Viollaz Mariana

Ecuador experienced moderate economic growth during the 2000s. The economy suffered a mild recession during the international crisis of 2008, but returned to pre-recession GDP per capita level in 2010. Most labour market indicators improved over the period. The only indicator that worsened was the employment structure by occupational position. Most labour market indicators were affected negatively by the international crisis but recovered their pre-crisis levels by 2012. The only exception was labour earnings for some employment categories. With the onset of the crisis of 2008, the poverty rate stopped falling, but it regained its downward trend from 2011 onwards.

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File URL: https://www.wider.unu.edu/sites/default/files/wp2015-076.pdf
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Paper provided by World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER) in its series WIDER Working Paper Series with number 076.

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Length: 44
Date of creation: 2015
Handle: RePEc:unu:wpaper:wp2015-076
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  1. Lawrence F. Katz & Kevin M. Murphy, 1992. "Changes in Relative Wages, 1963–1987: Supply and Demand Factors," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 107(1), pages 35-78.
  2. Mideros Andrés & O’Donoghue Cathal, 2015. "The Effect of Unconditional Cash Transfers on Adult Labour Supply: A Unitary Discrete Choice Model for the Case of Ecuador," Basic Income Studies, De Gruyter, vol. 10(2), pages 225-255, December.
  3. Rebecca Ray & Sara Kozameh, 2012. "Ecuador’s Economy Since 2007," CEPR Reports and Issue Briefs 2012-14, Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR).
  4. Azevedo, Joao Pedro & Inchauste, Gabriela & Olivieri, Sergio & Saavedra, Jaime & Winkler, Hernan, 2013. "Is labor income responsible for poverty reduction ? a decomposition approach," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6414, The World Bank.
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