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Mozambique: Off-track or Temporarily Sidelined?

Author

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  • Arndt Channing
  • Jones Sam
  • Tarp Finn

Abstract

Since 1994, a great deal has been accomplished. We argue that poverty reduction was temporarily sidelined in the 2000s. A series of shocks, especially the fuel and food price crisis of 2008, combined with poor productivity growth in agriculture and a weather shock, undermined progress in measured consumption poverty. We expect progress in poverty reduction to resume. These shocks also exposed persistent weaknesses in development strategies and programmes. Nevertheless, Mozambique has the potential to achieve rapid and broad-based economic and social progress. With key reforms and success in maintaining peace and stability, it will.

Suggested Citation

  • Arndt Channing & Jones Sam & Tarp Finn, 2015. "Mozambique: Off-track or Temporarily Sidelined?," WIDER Working Paper Series 044, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  • Handle: RePEc:unu:wpaper:wp2015-044
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    File URL: https://www.wider.unu.edu/sites/default/files/wp2015-044.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Jones, Sam & Tarp, Finn, 2013. "Jobs and Welfare in Mozambique," WIDER Working Paper Series 045, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    2. Channing Arndt & Sam Jones & Vincenzo Salvucci, 2015. "When do relative prices matter for measuring income inequality? The case of food prices in Mozambique," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 13(3), pages 449-464, September.
    3. Arndt, Channing & Benfica, Rui & Maximiano, Nelson & Nucifora, Antonio M.D. & Thurlow, James, 2008. "Higher fuel and food prices: Economic impacts and responses for Mozambique," IFPRI discussion papers 836, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    4. Alfani, Federica & Azzarri, Carlo & d'Errico, Marco & Molini, Vasco, 2012. "Poverty in Mozambique : new evidence from recent household surveys," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6217, The World Bank.
    5. Tarp, Finn & Arndt, Channing & Jensen, Henning Tarp & Robinson, Sherman & Heltberg, Rasmus, 2002. "Facing the development challenge in Mozambique: an economywide perspective," Research reports 126, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    6. Channing Arndt & Rui Benfica & Nelson Maximiano & Antonio M. D. Nucifora & James T. Thurlow, 2008. "Higher fuel and food prices: impacts and responses for Mozambique," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 39(s1), pages 497-511, November.
    7. Channing Arndt & M. Azhar Hussain & E. Samuel Jones & Virgulino Nhate & Finn Tarp & James Thurlow, 2011. "Explaining Poverty Evolution: The Case of Mozambique," WIDER Working Paper Series 017, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    8. Muellbauer, John, 1974. "Prices and Inequality: The United Kingdom Experience," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 84(333), pages 32-55, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Antonio Cruz & Helen Barnes & Gemma Wright & Michell Mpike & Vanda Castelo & Michael Noble & Finório Castigo, 2016. "Tax-benefit microsimulation modelling in Mozambique: A feasibility study," WIDER Working Paper Series 027, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    2. Ulrik Beck, 2015. "Keep it real: Measuring real inequality using survey data from developing countries," WIDER Working Paper Series 133, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    3. Channing Arndt & Sam Jones & Kristi Mahrt & Vincenzo Salvucci & Finn Tarp, 2016. "A review of consumption poverty estimation for Mozambique," WIDER Working Paper Series 035, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Economic development; Economic growth; Equality and inequality; Poverty; Public welfare;

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