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Aid to Africa: The Changing Context

Listed author(s):
  • Addison, Tony
  • Singhal, Saurabh
  • Tarp, Finn

To continue its economic growth and create new and better livelihoods, Africa must transform the productive side of its economy. Ongoing globalization–in trade, finance, and technology–opens up new possibilities for structural transformation, but also new risks as Africa´s integration with the global economy evolves. Climate change is impacting productive sectors and the livelihoods linked to them. Consolidating war-to-peace transition remains imperative for the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Somalia, and others, as they need inclusive growth to reinforce the politics of peace. This is the context within which official development assistance must operate and evolve if it is to remain useful.

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File URL: https://www.wider.unu.edu/sites/default/files/WP2013-144.pdf
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Paper provided by World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER) in its series WIDER Working Paper Series with number 144.

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Length: 14
Date of creation: 2013
Handle: RePEc:unu:wpaper:wp2013-144
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  1. Nicolas Berman & Philippe Martin, 2012. "The Vulnerability of Sub-Saharan Africa to Financial Crises: The Case of Trade," IMF Economic Review, Palgrave Macmillan;International Monetary Fund, vol. 60(3), pages 329-364, September.
  2. Markus Brückner, 2013. "On the simultaneity problem in the aid and growth debate," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 28(1), pages 126-150, 01.
  3. Michael A. Clemens & Steven Radelet & Rikhil R. Bhavnani & Samuel Bazzi, 2012. "Counting Chickens when they Hatch: Timing and the Effects of Aid on Growth," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 122(561), pages 590-617, 06.
  4. Page, John & Soderbom, Måns, 2012. "Is Small Beautiful? Small Enterprise, Aid and Employment in Africa," WIDER Working Paper Series 094, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  5. Raghuram G. Rajan & Arvind Subramanian, 2008. "Aid and Growth: What Does the Cross-Country Evidence Really Show?," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 90(4), pages 643-665, November.
  6. World Bank, 2013. "World Development Report 2014
    [Informe sobre el desarrollo mundial 2014, Riesgo y oportunidad : la administración del riesgo como instrumento de desarrollo - Panorama general]
    ," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 16092, September.
  7. repec:unu:wpaper:wp2012-32 is not listed on IDEAS
  8. Tony Addison & Channing Arndt & Finn Tarp, 2011. "The Triple Crisis and the Global Aid Architecture," African Development Review, African Development Bank, vol. 23(4), pages 461-478.
  9. David Dollar & Craig Burnside, 2000. "Aid, Policies, and Growth," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(4), pages 847-868, September.
  10. Minoiu, Camelia & Reddy, Sanjay G., 2010. "Development aid and economic growth: A positive long-run relation," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 50(1), pages 27-39, February.
  11. Katarina Juselius & Niels Framroze Møller & Finn Tarp, 2014. "The Long-Run Impact of Foreign Aid in 36 African Countries: Insights from Multivariate Time Series Analysis," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 76(2), pages 153-184, 04.
  12. Justin Yifu Lin, 2012. "From Flying Geese To Leading Dragons: New Opportunities and Strategies for Structural Transformation in Developing Countries," Global Policy, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 3(4), pages 397-409, November.
  13. Jones, Sam & Tarp, Finn, 2013. "Jobs and Welfare in Mozambique," WIDER Working Paper Series 045, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  14. Christopher Blattman & Nathan Fiala & Sebastian Martinez, 2014. "Generating Skilled Self-Employment in Developing Countries: Experimental Evidence from Uganda," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 129(2), pages 697-752.
  15. Arndt, Channing & Jones, Sam & Tarp, Finn, 2015. "Assessing Foreign Aid’s Long-Run Contribution to Growth and Development," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 69(C), pages 6-18.
  16. Hudson, John, 2012. "Consequences of Aid Volatility for Macroeconomic Management and Aid Effectiveness," WIDER Working Paper Series 035, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  17. Channing Arndt & Paul Chinowsky & Kenneth Strzepek & James Thurlow, 2012. "Climate Change, Growth and Infrastructure Investment: The Case of Mozambique," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 16(3), pages 463-475, August.
  18. Boone, Peter, 1996. "Politics and the effectiveness of foreign aid," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 40(2), pages 289-329, February.
  19. World Bank, 2012. "De-fragmenting Africa : Deepening Regional Trade Integration in Goods and Services
    [La défragmentation de l’Afrique : Approfondissement de l’intégration du commerce régional des biens et services]
    ," World Bank Other Operational Studies 12385, The World Bank.
  20. Elizabeth Asiedu & Isaac Kalonda-Kanyama & Leonce Ndikumana & Akwasi Nti-Addae, 2013. "Access to Credit by Firms in Sub-Saharan Africa: How Relevant Is Gender?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 103(3), pages 293-297, May.
  21. Wouter Zant, 2012. "Is EU Support to Malawi Agriculture Effective?," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 12-090/V, Tinbergen Institute.
  22. Page, John, 2012. "Aid, Structural Change and the Private Sector in Africa," WIDER Working Paper Series 021, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  23. Manning, Richard, 2012. "Aid as a Second-Best Solution : Seven Problems of Effectiveness and How to Tackle Them," WIDER Working Paper Series 024, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  24. Channing Arndt & Sam Jones & Finn Tarp, 2011. "Aid Effectiveness: Opening the Black Box," WIDER Working Paper Series 044, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
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