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The Effectiveness of Foreign Aid for Sustainable Energy

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  • Rogner, Hans-Holger

Abstract

Foreign aid and technology transfer are an essential means, especially for the least developed countries, towards meeting the Millennium Development Goals as well as facilitating adaptation to, and mitigation of, climate change. The deployment of technologies harvesting renewable energy flows and efficiency improvements is the key for improving access to modern energy services and mitigating climate change. However, support of sustainable energy, until recent, has been the step-child of foreign aid and its efficacy has been questioned. This paper reviews what the literature has to offer as to the effectiveness of foreign aid for sustainable energy and climate mitigation.

Suggested Citation

  • Rogner, Hans-Holger, 2013. "The Effectiveness of Foreign Aid for Sustainable Energy," WIDER Working Paper Series 055, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  • Handle: RePEc:unu:wpaper:wp2013-055
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Kostka, Genia & Moslener, Ulf & Andreas, Jan G., 2011. "Barriers to energy efficiency improvement: Empirical evidence from small-and-medium sized enterprises in China," Frankfurt School - Working Paper Series 178, Frankfurt School of Finance and Management.
    2. Tony Addison & Channing Arndt & Finn Tarp, 2011. "The Triple Crisis and the Global Aid Architecture," African Development Review, African Development Bank, vol. 23(4), pages 461-478.
    3. Hristos Doucouliagos & Martin Paldam, 2009. "The Aid Effectiveness Literature: The Sad Results Of 40 Years Of Research," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 23(3), pages 433-461, July.
    4. Simeon Djankov & Jose G. Montalvo & Marta Reynal-Querol, 2006. "Does Foreign Aid Help," Cato Journal, Cato Journal, Cato Institute, vol. 26(1), pages 1-28, Winter.
    5. Easterly, William, 2005. "What did structural adjustment adjust?: The association of policies and growth with repeated IMF and World Bank adjustment loans," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 76(1), pages 1-22, February.
    6. Mahama, Amadu, 2012. "2012 international year for sustainable energy for all: African Frontrunnership in rural electrification," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 76-82.
    7. Kozloff, Keith, 1995. "Rethinking development assistance for renewable electric power," Renewable Energy, Elsevier, vol. 6(3), pages 215-231.
    8. Bettina Kretschmer & Michael Hübler & Peter Nunnenkamp, 2013. "Does Foreign Aid Reduce Energy And Carbon Intensities Of Developing Economies?," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 25(1), pages 67-91, January.
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    Keywords

    Climatic changes; Economic assistance and foreign aid; Environmental economics; Renewable energy sources;

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