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The Political Economy of Food Pricing Policy in China

  • Huang, Jikun
  • Rozelle, Scott
  • Yang, Jun

The overall goal of this paper is to analyse the political economy of food price policies in China during the global food crisis. The results show that given China´s unique economic and political context and the nature of its agricultural markets, the government´s reaction to the crisis was swift and decisive. Responses, which considered the interests of the relevant stakeholders, included both short-term counter-measures that covered a wide range of domestic and border policies as well as long-term policy changes on biofuels and agricultural investment. This, in conjunction with the country´s political system, meant that the decision-making process encountered no problems and that the impacts of policy responses by the government achieved the envisaged objectives.

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Paper provided by World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER) in its series Working Paper Series with number UNU-WIDER Research Paper WP2013/038.

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Length: 29
Date of creation: 2013
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:unu:wpaper:wp2013-038
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  1. Huang, Jikun & Zhi, Huayong & Huang, Zhurong & Rozelle, Scott & Giles, John, 2010. "The impact of the global financial crisis on off-farm employment and earnings in rural China," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5439, The World Bank.
  2. Michael Wüger & Gerhard Thury, 2001. "The treatment of seasonality in error correction models as unobserved component: a case study for an Austrian consumption function," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 26(2), pages 325-341.
  3. Wang, Honglin & Dong, Xiaoxia & Rozelle, Scott & Huang, Jikun & Reardon, Thomas, 2009. "Producing and Procuring Horticultural Crops with Chinese Characteristics: The Case of Northern China," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 37(11), pages 1791-1801, November.
  4. Maros Ivanic & Will Martin, 2008. "Implications of higher global food prices for poverty in low-income countries-super-1," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 39(s1), pages 405-416, November.
  5. Jun Yang & Huanguang Qiu & Jikun Huang & Scott Rozelle, 2008. "Fighting global food price rises in the developing world: the response of China and its effect on domestic and world markets," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 39(s1), pages 453-464, November.
  6. Ivanic, Maros & Martin, Will, 2008. "Implications of higher global food prices for poverty in low-income countries," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4594, The World Bank.
  7. Luo, Renfu & Zhang, Linxiu & Huang, Jikun & Rozelle, Scott, 2007. "Elections, fiscal reform and public goods provision in rural China," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(3), pages 583-611, September.
  8. Bruggemann, Ralf & Lutkepohl, Helmut & Saikkonen, Pentti, 2006. "Residual autocorrelation testing for vector error correction models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 134(2), pages 579-604, October.
  9. Huang, Jikun & Rozelle, Scott, 2006. "The emergence of agricultural commodity markets in China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 17(3), pages 266-280.
  10. Jikun Huang & Xiaobing Wang & Huayong Zhi & Zhurong Huang & Scott Rozelle, 2011. "Subsidies and distortions in China’s agriculture: evidence from producer‐level data," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 55(1), pages 53-71, 01.
  11. Cai, Fang & Wang, Dewen & Du, Yang, 2002. "Regional disparity and economic growth in China: The impact of labor market distortions," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 13(2-3), pages 197-212.
  12. Huang, Jikun & Liu, Yu & Martin, Will & Rozelle, Scott, 2009. "Changes in trade and domestic distortions affecting China's agriculture," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 34(5), pages 407-416, October.
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