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Can Cities or Towns Drive African Development? Economy-wide Analysis for Ethiopia and Uganda

  • Dorosh, Paul
  • Thurlow, James

Rapid urbanization is an important characteristic of African development and yet the structural transformation debate focuses on agriculture.s relative merits without also considering the benefits from urban agglomeration. As a result, African governments

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Paper provided by World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER) in its series Working Paper Series with number UNU-WIDER Research Paper WP2012/50.

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Length: 24
Date of creation: 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:unu:wpaper:wp2012-50
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  1. Manfred Wiebelt & Karl Pauw & John Mary Matovu & Evarist Twimukye & Todd Benson, 2011. "Managing Future Oil Revenues in Uganda for Agricultural Development and Poverty Reduction: A CGE Analysis of Challenges and Options," Kiel Working Papers 1696, Kiel Institute for the World Economy.
  2. Haggblade, Steven & Hazell, Peter B. & Brown, James, 1988. "Farm-nonfarm linkages in rural sub-Saharan Africa," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6, The World Bank.
  3. Adelman, Irma, 1984. "Beyond export-led growth," CUDARE Working Paper Series 309, University of California at Berkeley, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics and Policy.
  4. Collier, Paul & Dercon, Stefan, 2014. "African Agriculture in 50Years: Smallholders in a Rapidly Changing World?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 63(C), pages 92-101.
  5. repec:fpr:ifprib:xinshendiao is not listed on IDEAS
  6. Lipton, Michael, 1980. "Migration from rural areas of poor countries: The impact on rural productivity and income distribution," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 8(1), pages 1-24, January.
  7. Adelman, Irma, 1984. "Beyond export-led growth," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 12(9), pages 937-949, September.
  8. J. Vernon Henderson & Hyoung Gun Wang, 2005. "Aspects of the rural-urban transformation of countries," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 5(1), pages 23-42, January.
  9. Jean-Marie Baland & Frederic Gaspart & Jean-Philippe Platteau & Frank Place, 2007. "The Distributive Impact of Land Markets in Uganda," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 55, pages 283-311.
  10. Hazell, Peter & Poulton, Colin & Wiggins, Steve & Dorward, Andrew, 2010. "The Future of Small Farms: Trajectories and Policy Priorities," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 38(10), pages 1349-1361, October.
  11. de Brauw, Alan & Mueller, Valerie, 2010. "Do Limitations in Land Rights Transferability Influence Low Mobility Rates in Ethiopia?," 2010 Annual Meeting, July 25-27, 2010, Denver, Colorado 60958, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  12. Martin Ravallion & Shaohua Chen & Prem Sangraula, 2007. "New Evidence on the Urbanization of Global Poverty," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 33(4), pages 667-701.
  13. Fan, Shenggen, 2008. "Public expenditures, growth, and poverty in developing countries: Lessons from developing countries," Issue briefs 51, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  14. Ravallion, Martin & Datt, Gaurav, 1996. "How Important to India's Poor Is the Sectoral Composition of Economic Growth?," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 10(1), pages 1-25, January.
  15. Paul Dorosh & James Thurlow, 2012. "Agglomeration, Growth and Regional Equity: An Analysis of Agriculture- versus Urban-led Development in Uganda," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 21(1), pages 94-123, January.
  16. Rosenthal, Stuart S. & Strange, William C., 2004. "Evidence on the nature and sources of agglomeration economies," Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics, in: J. V. Henderson & J. F. Thisse (ed.), Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics, edition 1, volume 4, chapter 49, pages 2119-2171 Elsevier.
  17. World Bank, 2011. "World Development Indicators 2011," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 2315.
  18. Gollin, Douglas, 2010. "Agricultural Productivity and Economic Growth," Handbook of Agricultural Economics, Elsevier.
  19. Masahisa Fujita & Paul Krugman & Anthony J. Venables, 2001. "The Spatial Economy: Cities, Regions, and International Trade," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262561476, June.
  20. de Brauw, Alan & Mueller, Valerie, 2011. "Do limitations in land rights transferability influence mobility rates in Ethiopia?:," ESSP working papers 18, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  21. Diao, Xinshen & Hazell, Peter & Thurlow, James, 2010. "The Role of Agriculture in African Development," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 38(10), pages 1375-1383, October.
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