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Effects of Food Price Shocks on Child Malnutrition

Author

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  • Arndt, Channing
  • Østerdal, Lars Peter
  • Hussain, M. Azhar

Abstract

A propitiously timed household survey carried out in Mozambique over the period 2008-09 permits us to evaluate the short-to-medium run relationship between sudden shocks to food prices and child nutrition status. We link local price inflation with child malnutrition status. We find that the prevalence of underweight amongst children rises in response to a higher inflation rate for basic food products. Stunting and wasting malnutrition measures are mostly insensitive to the inflation rate. The very high food inflation during 2008/09 was responsible for an extra 39,000 moderately underweight and 24,000 severely underweight children.

Suggested Citation

  • Arndt, Channing & Østerdal, Lars Peter & Hussain, M. Azhar, 2012. "Effects of Food Price Shocks on Child Malnutrition," WIDER Working Paper Series 089, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  • Handle: RePEc:unu:wpaper:wp2012-089
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Katharina Lehmann-Uschner & Kati Kraehnert, 2017. "Food Intake and the Role of Food Self-Provisioning," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 53(8), pages 1303-1322, August.
    2. Mary, Sebastien & Gomez y Paloma, Sergio, 2014. "The Role of Agricultural Growth in Reducing Child Malnutrition," 2014 Annual Meeting, July 27-29, 2014, Minneapolis, Minnesota 168368, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    3. Kalkuhl, Matthias & von Braun, Joachim & Torero, Maximo, 2016. "Food Price Volatility and Its Implications for Food Security and Policy," MPRA Paper 72164, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Matthias Kalkuhl & Lukas Kornher & Marta Kozicka & Pierre Boulanger & Maximo Torero, 2013. "Conceptual framework on price volatility and its impact on food and nutrition security in the short term," FOODSECURE Working papers 15, LEI Wageningen UR.
    5. Jean-Christophe Bureau & Jo Swinnen, 2017. "EU policies and global food security," Working Papers of Department of Economics, Leuven 578549, KU Leuven, Faculty of Economics and Business (FEB), Department of Economics, Leuven.
    6. Matthias Kalkuhl & Mekbib Haile & Lukas Kornher & Marta Kozicka, 2015. "Cost-benefit framework for policy action to navigate food price spikes. FOODSECURE Working Paper No 33," FOODSECURE Working papers 33, LEI Wageningen UR.

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