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Emerging Evidence on the Relative Importance of Sectoral Sources of Growth in Sub-Saharan Africa

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  • Ogunleye, Eric Kehinde

Abstract

Purposeful, well-targeted and successful transformation policies will be elusive for a country or region that does not understand the relative importance of its sectoral sources of growth. This study aims at eliciting our understanding in this respect by providing an assessment of the relative importance of the major sectors as sources of growth in sub-Saharan African (SSA) countries. Our findings reveal that, contrary to the general belief that agriculture is the most important contributor to economic growth in SSA countries, rather it is the service sector that leads, followed by agriculture and manufacturing. While not discounting policies aimed at strengthening all sectors, the service sector particularly needs to be better positioned to foster sustainable economic growth in SSA countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Ogunleye, Eric Kehinde, 2011. "Emerging Evidence on the Relative Importance of Sectoral Sources of Growth in Sub-Saharan Africa," WIDER Working Paper Series 061, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  • Handle: RePEc:unu:wpaper:wp2011-61
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Asongu, Simplice, 2015. "Growth and Institutions in African Development by Augustin K. Fosu," MPRA Paper 68656, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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    Keywords

    Economic growth; sectoral drivers; Arellano-Bond;

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