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Infrastructure and Poverty Reduction: Implications for Urban Development in Nigeria

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  • Ogun, T. P.

Abstract

The paper investigates the impact of infrastructural development on poverty reduction in Nigeria. Specifically, the relative effects of physical and social infrastructure on living standards or poverty indicators are examined, with a view to providing emp

Suggested Citation

  • Ogun, T. P., 2010. "Infrastructure and Poverty Reduction: Implications for Urban Development in Nigeria," WIDER Working Paper Series 043, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  • Handle: RePEc:unu:wpaper:wp2010-43
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    File URL: http://www.wider.unu.edu/sites/default/files/2010-43.pdf
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    3. Fan, Shenggen & Chan-Kang, Connie, 2004. "Road development, economic growth, and poverty reduction in China," DSGD discussion papers 12, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    4. Benkwitz, Alexander & L tkepohl, Helmut & Wolters, J rgen, 2001. "Comparison Of Bootstrap Confidence Intervals For Impulse Responses Of German Monetary Systems," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 5(01), pages 81-100, February.
    5. Canning, David & Bennathan, Esra, 2000. "The social rate of return on infrastructure investments," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2390, The World Bank.
    6. Shenggen Fan & Peter Hazell & Sukhadeo Thorat, 2000. "Government Spending, Growth and Poverty in Rural India," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 82(4), pages 1038-1051.
    7. Sims, Christopher A, 1980. "Comparison of Interwar and Postwar Business Cycles: Monetarism Reconsidered," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 70(2), pages 250-257, May.
    8. Hafiz A. Pasha & T. Palanivel, 2003. "Pro-poor Growth and Policies: The Asian Experience," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 42(4), pages 313-348.
    9. Johansen, Soren & Juselius, Katarina, 1990. "Maximum Likelihood Estimation and Inference on Cointegration--With Applications to the Demand for Money," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 52(2), pages 169-210, May.
    10. Fan, Shenggen & Zhang, Linxiu & Zhang, Xiaobo, 2002. "Growth, inequality, and poverty in rural China: the role of public investments," Research reports 125, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    11. Greenwood, Michael J, 1975. "Research on Internal Migration in the United States: A Survey," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 13(2), pages 397-433, June.
    12. Antonio Estache & V. Foster & Q. Wodon, 2002. "Accounting for Poverty in Infrastructure Reform: Learning from Latin America's Experience," ULB Institutional Repository 2013/44108, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
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    1. repec:gam:jsusta:v:9:y:2017:i:11:p:2108-:d:119535 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Oulay Phadouangdeth & Sounthone Phommason & Phouphet Kyophilavong & Inpaeng Sayvaya, 2014. "Does the Accession of Road Reduce the Poverty? Evidence from Northern, Central, and Southern Parts of Lao PDR," International Journal of Economics and Empirical Research (IJEER), The Economics and Social Development Organization (TESDO), vol. 2(9), pages 377-386, September.
    3. Raihan, Selim, 2011. "Infrastructure and Growth and Poverty in Bangladesh," MPRA Paper 37882, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Olusegun Ayodele Akanbi, 2015. "Structural and Institutional Determinants of Poverty in Sub-Saharan African Countries," Journal of Human Development and Capabilities, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(1), pages 122-141, February.
    5. Pao, Hsiao-Tien & Li, Yi-Ying & Hsin-Chia Fu,, 2014. "Clean energy, non-clean energy, and economic growth in the MIST countries," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 67(C), pages 932-942.

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    Keywords

    African urbanism; everyday practices; social infrastructures; urban violence;

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