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The Face of Urban Poverty Explaining the Prevalence of Slums in Developing Countries

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  • Arimah, C. Ben

Abstract

One of the most visible and enduring manifestations of urban poverty in developing countries is the formation and proliferation of slums. While attention has focused on the rapid pace of urbanization as the sole or major factor explaining the proliferation of slums and squatter settlements in developing countries, there are other factors whose impacts are not known with much degree of certainty. It is also not clear how the effects of these factors vary across regions of the developing world. This paper accounts for differences in the prevalence of slums among developing countries using data drawn from the recent global assessment of slums undertaken by the United Nations Human Settlements Programme. The empirical analysis identifies substantial inter-country variations in the incidence of slums both within and across the regions of Africa, Asia as well as, Latin America and the Caribbean. Further analysis indicates that higher GDP

Suggested Citation

  • Arimah, C. Ben, 2010. "The Face of Urban Poverty Explaining the Prevalence of Slums in Developing Countries," WIDER Working Paper Series 030, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  • Handle: RePEc:unu:wpaper:wp2010-30
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    File URL: http://www.wider.unu.edu/sites/default/files/wp2010-30.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Kaufmann, Daniel & Kraay, Aart & Zoido-Lobaton, Pablo, 1999. "Governance matters," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2196, The World Bank.
    2. Kaufmann, Daniel & Kraay, Aart & Zoido-Lobaton, Pablo, 1999. "Aggregating governance indicators," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2195, The World Bank.
    3. Mayo, Stephen K & Malpezzi, Stephen & Gross, David J, 1986. "Shelter Strategies for the Urban Poor in Developing Countries," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 1(2), pages 183-203, July.
    4. Ben Arimah, 2004. "Poverty Reduction and Human Development in Africa," Journal of Human Development and Capabilities, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 5(3), pages 399-415.
    5. Sumila Gulyani & Ellen M Bassett, 2007. "Retrieving the baby from the bathwater: slum upgrading in Sub-Saharan Africa," Environment and Planning C: Government and Policy, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 25(4), pages 486-515, August.
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    Keywords

    urban poverty; slums; developing countries; inter-country differences;

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