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Valuing the Prevention of an Infestation: The Threat of the New Zealand Mud Snail in Northern Nevada

Author

Listed:
  • Allison Davis

    (Department of Agricultural Economics, University of Kentucky)

  • Klaus Moeltner

    () (Department of Resource Economics, University of Nevada, Reno)

Abstract

The Truckee / Carson / Walker River Watershed in Northern Nevada is under an imminent threat of infestation by the New Zealand Mud Snail, an aquatic nuisance species with the potential to harm recreational fisheries. We combine a utility-theoretic system-demand model of recreational angling with a Bayesian econometric framework to provide estimates of trip and welfare losses under different types of regulatory control policies. We find that such losses can be substantial, warranting immediate investments in preemptive strategies via public outreach and awareness campaigns.

Suggested Citation

  • Allison Davis & Klaus Moeltner, 2009. "Valuing the Prevention of an Infestation: The Threat of the New Zealand Mud Snail in Northern Nevada," Working Papers 09-001, University of Nevada, Reno, Department of Economics;University of Nevada, Reno , Department of Resource Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:unr:wpaper:09-001
    as

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    File URL: http://www.coba.unr.edu/econ/wp/papers/UNRECONWP09001.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2009
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    New Zealand Mud Snail; Incomplete Demand System; Hierarchical Modeling; Bayesian Simulation;

    JEL classification:

    • C11 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Bayesian Analysis: General
    • C35 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Discrete Regression and Qualitative Choice Models; Discrete Regressors; Proportions
    • Q22 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Fishery
    • Q26 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Recreational Aspects of Natural Resources
    • Q51 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Valuation of Environmental Effects

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