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Paradoxes of Traffic Flow and Economics of Congestion Pricing


  • Chengri Ding

    () (Urban Studies and Planning Program, University of Maryland)

  • Shunfeng Song

    () (Department of Economics, University of Nevada, Reno)

  • Yiling Zhang

    () (Department of Economics, University of Nevada, Reno)


This paper utilizes a unique county-level dataset to examine technical efficiency and technology gap in China’s agriculture. We classify the counties into four regions with distinctive levels of economic development, and hence production technologies. A meta-frontier analysis is applied to the counties. We find that although the eastern counties have the highest efficiency scores with respect to the regional frontier but the northeastern region leads in terms of agricultural production technology nationwide. Meanwhile, the mean efficiency of the northeastern counties is particularly low, suggesting technology and knowledge diffusion within region might help to improve production efficiency and thus output.

Suggested Citation

  • Chengri Ding & Shunfeng Song & Yiling Zhang, 2008. "Paradoxes of Traffic Flow and Economics of Congestion Pricing," Working Papers 08-007, University of Nevada, Reno, Department of Economics;University of Nevada, Reno , Department of Resource Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:unr:wpaper:08-007

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Harrington, Winston & Krupnick, Alan J. & Alberini, Anna, 2001. "Overcoming public aversion to congestion pricing," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 35(2), pages 87-105, February.
    2. Small, Kenneth A., 1992. "Using the Revenues from Congestion Pricing," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt32p9m3mm, University of California Transportation Center.
    3. Hartman, John Lawrence, 2007. "A Route Choice Experiment With an Efficient Toll," University of California at Santa Barbara, Economics Working Paper Series qt4s1116mv, Department of Economics, UC Santa Barbara.
    4. Richard Arnott & Kenneth Small, 1993. "The Economics Of Traffic Congestion," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 256, Boston College Department of Economics.
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    Cited by:

    1. Hakim Hammadou & Claire Papaix, 2015. "Policy packages for modal shift and CO2 reduction in Lille, France," Working Papers 1501, Chaire Economie du climat.
    2. repec:cec:wpaper:1415 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item


    China’s grain production; County-level; Metafrontier; Stochastic production frontier; Technical efficiency;

    JEL classification:

    • D24 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Production; Cost; Capital; Capital, Total Factor, and Multifactor Productivity; Capacity
    • N55 - Economic History - - Agriculture, Natural Resources, Environment and Extractive Industries - - - Asia including Middle East
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products

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