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Industrial Upgrade, Employment Shock and Land Centralization in China

Author

Listed:
  • Shunfeng Song

    () (Department of Economics, University of Nevada, Reno)

  • Chengsi Wang

    () (Department of Economics, University of New South Wales)

  • Jianghuai Zheng

    () (Department of Economics, Nanjing University)

Abstract

This paper investigates the relationships among industrial upgrading, mid-aged peasants’ non-farm employment, and land conversion systems. We prove that China’s efforts to upgrade its industries generate a negative employment shock on mid-aged peasant workers, forcing some of them to return to their home villages. The current lump-sum land acquisition system, however, will neither help peasant workers deal with the adverse employment shock nor promote land centralization for industrial and urban uses. On contrary, land cooperation, an emerging land centralization system, will help peasant workers mitigate the adverse employment shock and centralize rural land for nonagricultural purposes.

Suggested Citation

  • Shunfeng Song & Chengsi Wang & Jianghuai Zheng, 2008. "Industrial Upgrade, Employment Shock and Land Centralization in China," Working Papers 08-006, University of Nevada, Reno, Department of Economics;University of Nevada, Reno , Department of Resource Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:unr:wpaper:08-006
    as

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    File URL: http://www.business.unr.edu/econ/wp/papers/UNRECONWP08006.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2008
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Zhang, Kevin Honglin & Song, Shunfeng, 2003. "Rural-urban migration and urbanization in China: Evidence from time-series and cross-section analyses," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 14(4), pages 386-400.
    2. Denise Hare, 1999. "'Push' versus 'pull' factors in migration outflows and returns: Determinants of migration status and spell duration among China's rural population," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(3), pages 45-72.
    3. Lu, Zhigang & Song, Shunfeng, 2006. "Rural-urban migration and wage determination: The case of Tianjin, China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 17(3), pages 337-345.
    4. Yaohui Zhao, 1999. "Leaving the Countryside: Rural-to-Urban Migration Decisions in China," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(2), pages 281-286, May.
    5. Zhao, Yaohui, 2002. "Causes and Consequences of Return Migration: Recent Evidence from China," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 376-394, June.
    6. Harris, John R & Todaro, Michael P, 1970. "Migration, Unemployment & Development: A Two-Sector Analysis," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 60(1), pages 126-142, March.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    Cited by:

    1. Jean Ruffier, 2012. "China Clothing Industry in World Textile Value Chains," Institutions and Economies (formerly known as International Journal of Institutions and Economies), Faculty of Economics and Administration, University of Malaya, vol. 4(3), pages 21-40, October.
    2. repec:wsi:serxxx:v:62:y:2017:i:02:n:s0217590815500642 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Jean Ruffier, 2008. "China Textile in Global Value Chain," Post-Print halshs-00649972, HAL.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Peasant workers; Industrial upgrade; Employment; Land centralization;

    JEL classification:

    • Q15 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Land Ownership and Tenure; Land Reform; Land Use; Irrigation; Agriculture and Environment
    • J43 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Agricultural Labor Markets

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