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Urban Poor in China: A Case Study of Changsha

Author

Listed:
  • Erqian Zhu

    () (Department of Resource Economics, University of Nevada, Reno)

  • Shunfeng Song

    () (Department of Economics, University of Nevada, Reno)

Abstract

Since the late 1970s, many state-owned enterprise employees have been laid off and more and more rural people have migrated to urban areas. In this massive laying-off and migration process, many laid-off workers and migrants have become urban poor. Using data collected from a survey on 1641 relatively low-income households in Changsha in January 2007, this paper compares migrant workers with their city counterpart regarding income, employment, education, and social support. Based on qualitative and regression analysis, we found that worker’s age, Hukou status, education, enterprise ownership, and contract length are significantly affecting the annual income. There exists a big gap in the coverage of social security between urban and migrant workers. This paper provides some policy recommendations.

Suggested Citation

  • Erqian Zhu & Shunfeng Song, 2007. "Urban Poor in China: A Case Study of Changsha," Working Papers 07-009, University of Nevada, Reno, Department of Economics;University of Nevada, Reno , Department of Resource Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:unr:wpaper:07-009
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    File URL: http://www.business.unr.edu/econ/wp/papers/UNRECONWP07009.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2007
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Chen, Zhihong, 2006. "Measuring the poverty lines for urban households in China--an equivalence scale method," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 17(3), pages 239-252.
    2. Jinjun Xue & Wei Zhong, 2003. "Unemployment, Poverty and Income Disparity in Urban China," Asian Economic Journal, East Asian Economic Association, vol. 17(4), pages 383-405, December.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Urban poor; Hukou; Laid-off workers; Migrant workers; Income determinants; Social insurance;

    JEL classification:

    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population
    • I30 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General

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