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Does the Party in Power Matter for Economic Performance?

Author

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  • Elliott Parker

    () (Department of Economics, University of Nevada, Reno)

Abstract

In this brief paper, I consider whether five common political beliefs have any basis in fact. Does the economy grow faster when Republicans are in charge? Does the size of the government actually keep expanding? If so, is this growth correlated with Democrats being in charge? Does bigger government lead to slower growth? Finally, is it accurate to characterize Democrats as the “tax and spend” party? While correlation is not causation and theoretical relationships are complex, the data on U.S. economic performance during the postwar period does not appear to support any of these beliefs, and in fact tends more to support the alternative hypotheses.

Suggested Citation

  • Elliott Parker, 2006. "Does the Party in Power Matter for Economic Performance?," Working Papers 06-008, University of Nevada, Reno, Department of Economics;University of Nevada, Reno , Department of Resource Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:unr:wpaper:06-008
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    File URL: http://www.business.unr.edu/econ/wp/papers/UNRECONWP06008.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2006
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Barro, Robert J, 1990. "Government Spending in a Simple Model of Endogenous Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 98(5), pages 103-126, October.
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    Cited by:

    1. André Corrêa d’Almeida & Paulo Reis Mourão, "undated". "The Irrelevance of Political Parties’ Differences for Public Finances - Evidence from Public Deficit and Debt in Portugal (1974 – 2012) Abstract: This paper attempts to empirically test whether inter-," NIPE Working Papers 11/2015, NIPE - Universidade do Minho.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    deficits; government spending; economic growth; political parties;

    JEL classification:

    • H00 - Public Economics - - General - - - General
    • H50 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - General
    • H60 - Public Economics - - National Budget, Deficit, and Debt - - - General

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