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Educational Opportunities and the Role of Institutions

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  • Ammermüller Andreas

    (ROA rm)

Abstract

Educational opportunities determine the intergenerational mobility of human capital and are affected by institutional features of schooling systems. The aim of this paper is twofold. It intends to show how strongly student performance depends on student background as well as to explain cross-country differences in educational opportunities by decisive features of educational systems. For the latter, a two-step approach is combined with a difference-in-differences estimation in order to control for country-specific effects. The results show that educational opportunities decrease with student age in most countries. However, the attitude of parents seems to become more important while social origin becomes less important. Institutions are linked to educational opportunities. It can be shown that the institutional features of the schooling system as indicated by streaming and private schools, instruction time and school autonomy are related to different dimensions of educational opportunities.

Suggested Citation

  • Ammermüller Andreas, 2005. "Educational Opportunities and the Role of Institutions," ROA Research Memorandum 004, Maastricht University, Research Centre for Education and the Labour Market (ROA).
  • Handle: RePEc:unm:umaror:2005004
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Birkenfeld, Florian & Hanafy, Shima'a, 2008. "Wie zentral sind die Abschlussprüfungen an deutschen Schulen wirklich?," Passauer Diskussionspapiere, Volkswirtschaftliche Reihe V-55-08, University of Passau, Faculty of Business and Economics.
    2. Massimiliano Bratti & Daniele Checchi & Antonio Filippin, 2011. "Should you compete or cooperate with your schoolmates?," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 19(3), pages 275-289.
    3. Dronkers Jaap & Velden Rolf van der & Dunne Allison, 2011. "The effects of educational systems, school-composition, track-level, parental background and immigrants’ origins on the achievement of 15-years old native and immigrant students. A reanalysis of PIS," ROA Research Memorandum 006, Maastricht University, Research Centre for Education and the Labour Market (ROA).

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    Keywords

    education; training and the labour market;

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