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Changes in women's willingness to work in a tightening labour market: the impact of preferences, wages and individual characteristics

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  • Cörvers,Frank
  • Golsteyn,Bart

    (ROA rm)

Abstract

The rapid increase of the female participation rate in the Netherlands gives rise to the hypothesis that the willingness of Dutch women to be employed grew strongly. We predict the number of hours women are willing to work by using the estimated parameters from a multistage least squares Heckit procedure. For a sample of Dutch women between 1994 and 1999 we find that there were significant differences in willingness to work between the employed, the unemployed, discouraged workers, and other non-participants. We also find a positive trend in the willingness to work for these groups, which seems to be almost entirely based on the changing individual characteristics of women, in particular the increase of the average level of education. Changing wages stimulated the working individuals, but had a negative effect on the willingness to work of the non-workers, who were on average lower educated. The effects of wages and preferences nearly outweighed each other for the non-workers.

Suggested Citation

  • Cörvers,Frank & Golsteyn,Bart, 2003. "Changes in women's willingness to work in a tightening labour market: the impact of preferences, wages and individual characteristics," ROA Research Memorandum 005, Maastricht University, Research Centre for Education and the Labour Market (ROA).
  • Handle: RePEc:unm:umaror:2003008
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    File URL: https://cris.maastrichtuniversity.nl/portal/files/1582828/content
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Flinn, Christopher J & Heckman, James J, 1983. "Are Unemployment and Out of the Labor Force Behaviorally Distinct Labor Force States?," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 1(1), pages 28-42, January.
    2. Blundell, Richard & Macurdy, Thomas, 1999. "Labor supply: A review of alternative approaches," Handbook of Labor Economics,in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 27, pages 1559-1695 Elsevier.
    3. Melvin Stephens, 2002. "Worker Displacement and the Added Worker Effect," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 20(3), pages 504-537, July.
    4. Ann P. Bartel & Nachum Sicherman, 1999. "Technological Change and Wages: An Interindustry Analysis," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 107(2), pages 285-325, April.
    5. Stephen R. G. Jones & W. Craig Riddell, 1998. "Unemployment and Labor Force Attachment: A Multistate Analysis of Nonemployment," NBER Chapters,in: Labor Statistics Measurement Issues, pages 123-155 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. T. Aldrich Finegan, 1981. "Discouraged Workers and Economic Fluctuations," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 35(1), pages 88-102, October.
    7. Darby, Julia & Hart, Robert A. & Vecchi, Michela, 2001. "Labour force participation and the business cycle: a comparative analysis of France, Japan, Sweden and the United States," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 13(2), pages 113-133, April.
    8. Euwals, Rob & van Soest, Arthur, 1999. "Desired and actual labour supply of unmarried men and women in the Netherlands," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 6(1), pages 95-118, March.
    9. Füsun Gönül, 1992. "New Evidence on Whether Unemployment and out of the Labor Force are Distinct States," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 27(2), pages 329-361.
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    Cited by:

    1. Vendrik Maarten & Cörvers Frank, 2009. "Male and female labour force participation: the role of dynamic adjustments to changes in labour demand, government policies and autonomous trends," Research Memorandum 036, Maastricht University, Maastricht Research School of Economics of Technology and Organization (METEOR).
    2. Rob Euwals & Marike Knoef & Daniel Vuuren, 2011. "The trend in female labour force participation: what can be expected for the future?," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 40(3), pages 729-753, May.
    3. An Liu & Inge Noback, 2011. "Determinants of regional female labour market participation in the Netherlands," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 47(3), pages 641-658, December.

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    Keywords

    education; training and the labour market;

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