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The Measurement of Overeducation and Undereducation: Self-Report vs. Job Analyst Method

Author

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  • Velden R.K.W. Van der
  • Smoorenburg M.S.M. van

    (ROA rm)

Abstract

This paper investigates the criterium validity of two different methods to determine the required educational level of an occupation. The selfreport method consists of asking employees directly what the required level of education for the job is. On the other hand, in the job-analyst method the determining of the required level of education for a particular job takes place by experts. Our analysis shows that, in essence, both methods measure the same concept (number of years of required education). However, they differ significantly with regard to the standard points, i.e. the points on the scale at which there is overeducation and undereducation. The analysis shows that the job-analyst method systematically overestimates the level of overeducation. There are no indications that the level of overeducation is underestimated in the self-report method.

Suggested Citation

  • Velden R.K.W. Van der & Smoorenburg M.S.M. van, 1997. "The Measurement of Overeducation and Undereducation: Self-Report vs. Job Analyst Method," ROA Research Memorandum 002, Maastricht University, Research Centre for Education and the Labour Market (ROA).
  • Handle: RePEc:unm:umaror:1997002
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    File URL: https://cris.maastrichtuniversity.nl/portal/files/691940/content
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Duncan, Greg J. & Hoffman, Saul D., 1981. "The incidence and wage effects of overeducation," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 1(1), pages 75-86, February.
    2. Groot, Wim, 1993. "Overeducation and the returns to enterprise-related schooling," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 12(4), pages 299-309, December.
    3. Clifford Clogg & James Shockey, 1984. "Mismatch between occupation and schooling: A prevalence measure, recent trends and demographic analysis," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 21(2), pages 235-257, May.
    4. Barron, John M & Black, Dan A & Loewenstein, Mark A, 1989. "Job Matching and On-the-Job Training," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 7(1), pages 1-19, January.
    5. Cohn, Elchanan & Khan, Shahina P., 1995. "The wage effects of overschooling revisited," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 2(1), pages 67-76, March.
    6. Sicherman, Nachum, 1991. ""Overeducation" in the Labor Market," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 9(2), pages 101-122, April.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Borghans,L. & Grip,A.,de, 1999. "Skills and low pay: upgrading or overeducation?," ROA Research Memorandum 005, Maastricht University, Research Centre for Education and the Labour Market (ROA).
    2. Hartog, Joop, 2000. "Over-education and earnings: where are we, where should we go?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 19(2), pages 131-147, April.
    3. Stefano Visintin & Kea Tijdens & Maarten van Klaveren, 2015. "Skill mismatch among migrant workers: evidence from a large multi-country dataset," IZA Journal of Migration, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 4(1), pages 1-34, December.
    4. repec:taf:applec:v:49:y:2017:i:26:p:2563-2578 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Kracke, Nancy & Reichelt, Malte & Vicari, Basha, 2017. "Wage losses due to overqualification: The role of formal degrees and occupational skills," IAB Discussion Paper 201710, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].

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    Keywords

    labour market entry;

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