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Subsidiarity, Solidarity, and Asymmetry

Author

Listed:
  • Richard M. Bird

    (University of Toronto)

  • Robert D. Ebel

    () (Urban Institute)

Abstract

An important characteristic of many countries is that they exhibit, to greater or lesser degrees, some 'asymmetry' in the way in which different regions are treated by their intergovernmental fiscal systems. This paper explores some of the varied extents and manners in which such asymmetrical treatment may help or hinder the maintenance of an effective nation-state, where 'effectiveness' encompasses both how effectively, efficiently, and (perhaps) equitably public services are provided throughout the national territory and also the effects asymmetry may have on the very existence of 'fragmented' nation-states

Suggested Citation

  • Richard M. Bird & Robert D. Ebel, 2005. "Subsidiarity, Solidarity, and Asymmetry," International Tax Program Papers 0509, International Tax Program, Institute for International Business, Joseph L. Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto.
  • Handle: RePEc:ttp:itpwps:0509
    as

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    File URL: http://www-2.rotman.utoronto.ca/iib/ITP0509.pdf
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. James Alm & H. Spencer Banzhaf, 2012. "Designing Economic Instruments For The Environment In A Decentralized Fiscal System," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 26(2), pages 177-202, April.
    2. Santiago Lago Peñas & Jorge Martínez Vázquez, 2010. "La descentralización tributaria en las Comunidades Autónomas de régimen común: un proceso inacabado," Hacienda Pública Española, IEF, vol. 192(1), pages 129-151, March.
    3. Alexander Libman, 2012. "Sub-national political regimes and asymmetric fiscal decentralization," Constitutional Political Economy, Springer, vol. 23(4), pages 302-336, December.
    4. Guillem López Casasnovas & Joan Rosselló Villalonga, 2014. "Fiscal Imbalances in Asymmetric Federal Regimes. The Case of Spain," Hacienda Pública Española, IEF, vol. 209(2), pages 55-97, June.
    5. M. Mahamallik & P. Sahu & S. Mahapatra, 2014. "The Paradox of Fiscal Imbalances in India," Working Papers wp969, Dipartimento Scienze Economiche, Universita' di Bologna.
    6. Jorge Martinez-Vazquez & Cristian Sepulveda, 2012. "Toward a More General Theory of Revenue Assignments," International Center for Public Policy Working Paper Series, at AYSPS, GSU paper1231, International Center for Public Policy, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University.
    7. Jorge Martinez-Vazquez & Cristian Sepúlveda, 2007. "The Municipal Transfer System in Nicaragua:Evaluation and Proposals for Reform," International Center for Public Policy Working Paper Series, at AYSPS, GSU paper0708, International Center for Public Policy, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University.
    8. Richard M. Bird, 2012. "Subnational Taxation in Large Emerging Countries: BRIC Plus One," International Center for Public Policy Working Paper Series, at AYSPS, GSU paper1201, International Center for Public Policy, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University.
    9. Richard M. Bird, 2013. "Below the Salt: Decentralizing Value-Added Taxes," International Center for Public Policy Working Paper Series, at AYSPS, GSU paper1302, International Center for Public Policy, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    federalism; decentralization; asymmetry; subsidiarity;

    JEL classification:

    • H70 - Public Economics - - State and Local Government; Intergovernmental Relations - - - General
    • D74 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Conflict; Conflict Resolution; Alliances; Revolutions

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