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Getting it Right: Financing Urban Development in China

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  • Richard M. Bird

    () (International Tax Program, Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto)

Abstract

This paper is a brief review of some issues in urban finance facing China’s larger cities. It argues that at present many key aspects of the ways in which local and metropolitan governments finance infrastructure and services in China seem to be both too obscure for proper accountability and too perverse for efficient use of scarce urban land and capital. Given the importance of urban areas for sustained national development, it is important to get urban finance “right” in the sense of providing the right signals to both public and private actors in urban development. Some suggestions are made on how this might perhaps be done by better designed user charges, property taxes, and other instruments.

Suggested Citation

  • Richard M. Bird, 2004. "Getting it Right: Financing Urban Development in China," International Tax Program Papers 0413, International Tax Program, Institute for International Business, Joseph L. Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto, revised Nov 2004.
  • Handle: RePEc:ttp:itpwps:0413
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    File URL: http://www-2.rotman.utoronto.ca/iib/ITP0413.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Daniel Kaufmann & Frannie Leautier & Massimo Mastruzzi, 2004. "Governance and the City: An Empirical Exploration into Global Determinants of Urban Performance," Urban/Regional 0405004, EconWPA.
    2. Michiel Evers & Ruud A. de Mooij & Herman R.J. Vollebergh, 2004. "Tax Competition under Minimum Rates: The Case of European Diesel Excises," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 04-062/3, Tinbergen Institute.
    3. Zhihua Zhang & Jorge Martinez-Vazquez, 2003. "The System of Equalization Transfers in China," International Center for Public Policy Working Paper Series, at AYSPS, GSU paper0312, International Center for Public Policy, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University.
    4. Au, Chun-Chung & Henderson, J. Vernon, 2006. "How migration restrictions limit agglomeration and productivity in China," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 80(2), pages 350-388, August.
    5. Richard M. Bird & Enid Slack, 2004. "Fiscal Aspects of Metropolitan Governance," International Tax Program Papers 0401, International Tax Program, Institute for International Business, Joseph L. Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto.
    6. Massimo Bordignon & Silvia Giannini & Paolo Panteghini, 2001. "Reforming Business Taxation: Lessons from Italy?," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 8(2), pages 191-210, March.
    7. Shahid Yusuf & Weiping Wu, 2002. "Pathways to a World City: Shanghai Rising in an Era of Globalisation," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 39(7), pages 1213-1240, June.
    8. Glenn P. Jenkins & Chun-Yan Kuo & Keh-Nan Sun, 2003. "Taxation and Economic Development in Taiwan," American Journal of Economics and Sociology, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 62(4), pages 734-735, October.
    9. Yusuf, Shahid & Weiping Wu, 2001. "Shanghai rising in a globalizing world," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2617, The World Bank.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Slack, Enid, 2007. "Managing the coordination of service delivery in metropolitan cities : the role of metropolitan governance," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4317, The World Bank.
    2. Denis Nitikin & Chunli Shen & Qian Wang & Heng-fu Zou, 2011. "Land Taxation in China: Assessment of Prospects for Politically and Economically Sustainable Reform," CEMA Working Papers 431, China Economics and Management Academy, Central University of Finance and Economics.
    3. Richard M. Bird, 2006. "Taxing Land and Property in Emerging Economies: Raising Revenue...and More?," International Tax Program Papers 0605, International Tax Program, Institute for International Business, Joseph L. Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto.
    4. Denis Nitikin & Chunli Shen & Qian Wang & Heng-fu Zou, 2012. "Evaluation of Land Taxation in China," Annals of Economics and Finance, Society for AEF, vol. 13(2), pages 489-528, November.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    China; urban finance; user charges; local taxes; infrastructure finance; public-private partnerships;

    JEL classification:

    • O18 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Urban, Rural, Regional, and Transportation Analysis; Housing; Infrastructure
    • H71 - Public Economics - - State and Local Government; Intergovernmental Relations - - - State and Local Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue
    • R51 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Regional Government Analysis - - - Finance in Urban and Rural Economies

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