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Administrative Dimensions of Tax Reform

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  • Richard M. Bird

    () (International Tax Program, Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto)

Abstract

The best tax policy in the world is worth little if it cannot be implemented effectively. Tax policy design in developing countries must therefore take the administrative dimension of taxation carefully into account. What can be done may to a considerable extent determine what is done in any country. This paper discusses the relationship between tax policy and tax administration. When can policy lead administration? When must policy initiatives wait on administrative reform? How exactly can both sides of the policy and administrative agenda be advanced together? The paper sets out the broad outlines of administrative reform -- the essential conditions for such reform, its principal components, and its limits as a way of solving critical tax problems and provides a short case study of the interaction of tax policy and tax administration in the Polish Tax reform of the early 1990s.

Suggested Citation

  • Richard M. Bird, 2003. "Administrative Dimensions of Tax Reform," International Tax Program Papers 0302, International Tax Program, Institute for International Business, Joseph L. Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto, revised May 2003.
  • Handle: RePEc:ttp:itpwps:0302
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    File URL: http://www-2.rotman.utoronto.ca/iib/ITP0302.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Richard M. Bird & Jorge Martinez-Vazquez & Benno Torgler, 2014. "Societal Institutions and Tax Effort in Developing Countries," Annals of Economics and Finance, Society for AEF, vol. 15(1), pages 301-351, May.
    2. Odd-Helge Fjeldstad, 2002. "Fighting fiscal corruption: The case of the Tanzania Revenue Authority," CMI Working Papers WP 2002:3, CMI (Chr. Michelsen Institute), Bergen, Norway.
    3. Slemrod, Joel & Yitzhaki, Shlomo, 2002. "Tax avoidance, evasion, and administration," Handbook of Public Economics,in: A. J. Auerbach & M. Feldstein (ed.), Handbook of Public Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 22, pages 1423-1470 Elsevier.
    4. Frank A. Cowell, 1990. "Cheating the Government: The Economics of Evasion," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262532484, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Di John, Jonathan, 2006. "The Political Economy of Taxation and Tax Reform in Developing Countries," WIDER Working Paper Series 074, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    2. Katarina Ott, 1998. "Tax Administration Reform in Transition: The Case of Croatia," Occasional paper series 05, Institute of Public Finance.
    3. Christian von Soest, 2006. "Measuring the Capability to Raise Revenue Process and Output Dimensions and Their Application to the Zambia Revenue Authority," GIGA Working Paper Series 35, GIGA German Institute of Global and Area Studies.
    4. Christian EBEKE & Mario MANSOUR & Grégoire ROTA-GRAZIOSI, 2016. "The Power to Tax in Sub-Saharan Africa: LTUs, VATs, and SARAs," Working Papers P154, FERDI.
    5. Richard M. Bird & Jorge Martinez-Vazquez & Benno Torgler, 2014. "Societal Institutions and Tax Effort in Developing Countries," Annals of Economics and Finance, Society for AEF, vol. 15(1), pages 301-351, May.
    6. M. Govinda Rao & R. Kavita Rao, 2005. "Trends and Issues in Tax Policy and Reform in India," India Policy Forum, Global Economy and Development Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 2(1), pages 55-122.
    7. James Alm & Jorge Martinez-Vazquez, 2007. "Tax Morale and Tax Evasion in Latin American Countries," International Center for Public Policy Working Paper Series, at AYSPS, GSU paper0732, International Center for Public Policy, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University.
    8. Jaime Vázquez-Caro & Richard M. Bird, 2011. "Benchmarking Tax Administrations in Developing Countries: A Systemic Approach," International Center for Public Policy Working Paper Series, at AYSPS, GSU paper1104, International Center for Public Policy, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University.
    9. Richard M. bird, 2003. "Taxation in Latin America: Reflections on Sustainability and the Balance between Equity and Efficiency," International Tax Program Papers 0306, International Tax Program, Institute for International Business, Joseph L. Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto.
    10. World Bank, 2004. "Investment Climate Assessment : Improving Enterprise Performance and Growth in Tanzania," World Bank Other Operational Studies 14413, The World Bank.
    11. Richard M. Bird, 2008. "Tax Challenges Facing Developing Countries," Working Papers id:1618, eSocialSciences.
    12. de Quatrebarbes, Céline & Boccanfuso, Dorothée & Savard, Luc, 2016. "Beyond representative households: The macro–micro impact analysis of VAT designs applied to Niger," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 76-92.
    13. Richard M Bird & Eric M Zolt, 2008. "Tax Policy in Emerging Countries," Environment and Planning C, , vol. 26(1), pages 73-86, February.
    14. Richard M. Bird, "undated". "VAT in Ukraine: An Interim Report," International Tax Program Papers 0503 Revised, International Tax Program, Institute for International Business, Joseph L. Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto.
    15. Richard Bird & Jorge Martinez-Vazquezb & Benno Torgler, 2007. "Tax Effort: The Impact of corruption, Voice and Accountability," International Tax Program Papers 0702 Classification - JEL, International Tax Program, Institute for International Business, Joseph L. Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto.
    16. James Alm & Jorge Martinez-Vazquez, 2007. "Tax Morale and Tax Evasion in Latin America," International Center for Public Policy Working Paper Series, at AYSPS, GSU paper0704, International Center for Public Policy, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University.
    17. Dorothée Boccanfuso & Céline de Quatrebarbes & Luc Savard, 2011. "Can the removal of VAT Exemptions support the Poor? The Case of Niger," Cahiers de recherche 11-04, Departement d'Economique de l'École de gestion à l'Université de Sherbrooke, revised 05 Dec 2015.
    18. Tonin, Mirco, 2010. "Too low to be true: the use of minimum thresholds to fight tax evasion," Discussion Paper Series In Economics And Econometrics 1018, Economics Division, School of Social Sciences, University of Southampton.
    19. James Alm & Mir Ahmad Khan, 2008. "Assessing Enterprise Taxation and the Investment Climate in Pakistan," International Center for Public Policy Working Paper Series, at AYSPS, GSU paper0810, International Center for Public Policy, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University.
    20. Henrik Jacobsen Kleven & Claus Thustrup Kreiner & Emmanuel Saez, 2016. "Why Can Modern Governments Tax So Much? An Agency Model of Firms as Fiscal Intermediaries," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 83(330), pages 219-246, April.
    21. Richard M. Bird, 2003. "Managing the Reform Process," International Tax Program Papers 0301, International Tax Program, Institute for International Business, Joseph L. Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto, revised May 2003.
    22. James Alm, 2018. "Is the Haig-Simons Standard Dead? The Uneasy Case for a Comprehensive Income Tax," Working Papers 1806, Tulane University, Department of Economics.
    23. Zeljko Bogetic & Fareed Hassan, 2005. "Personal Income Tax Reform and Revenue Potential in Transition," Public Economics 0510003, EconWPA.
    24. Hassan, Fareed M. A., 1998. "Revenue-productive income tax structures and tax reforms in emerging market economies - evidence from Bulgaria," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1927, The World Bank.
    25. Chen, Shawn Xiaoguang, 2017. "The effect of a fiscal squeeze on tax enforcement: Evidence from a natural experiment in China," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 147(C), pages 62-76.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    tax administration; tax policy; tax reform; Poland;

    JEL classification:

    • H29 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Other
    • H83 - Public Economics - - Miscellaneous Issues - - - Public Administration

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