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Technological Diffusion and Asset Prices

  • Edgar Ghossoub

    (The University of Texas at San Antonio)

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    In this paper we demonstrate that the gradual diffusion of technology causes the stock market to exhibit a cyclical behavior. More importantly, we attribute sharp declines and increases in the stock market such as the ones that occurred in the early 1970s and mid 1990s in the United States to expected rapid technological diffusion.

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    Paper provided by College of Business, University of Texas at San Antonio in its series Working Papers with number 0002.

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    Length: 12 pages
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    Handle: RePEc:tsa:wpaper:0103
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    1. Bart Hobijn & Boyan Jovanovic, 2001. "The Information-Technology Revolution and the Stock Market: Evidence," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(5), pages 1203-1220, December.
    2. Luboš Pástor & Pietro Veronesi, 2009. "Technological Revolutions and Stock Prices," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 99(4), pages 1451-83, September.
    3. Boyan Jovanovic & Jeremy Greenwood, 1999. "The Information-Technology Revolution and the Stock Market," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(2), pages 116-122, May.
    4. Parente, Stephen L & Prescott, Edward C, 1994. "Barriers to Technology Adoption and Development," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 102(2), pages 298-321, April.
    5. Elias Dinopoulos & Douglas Waldo, 2005. "Gradual Product Replacement, Intangible-Asset Prices and Schumpeterian Growth," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 10(2), pages 135-157, 06.
    6. Philippe Aghion, 2002. "Schumpeterian Growth Theory and the Dynamics of Income Inequality," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 70(3), pages 855-882, May.
    7. Lucas, Robert E, Jr, 1978. "Asset Prices in an Exchange Economy," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 46(6), pages 1429-45, November.
    8. John Laitner & Dmitriy Stolyarov, 2003. "Technological Change and the Stock Market," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(4), pages 1240-1267, September.
    9. Aghion, Philippe, 2002. "Schumpeterian Growth Theory and the Dynamics of Income Inequality," Scholarly Articles 3350067, Harvard University Department of Economics.
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