IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Environmental policy and the properties of Environmental damages

  • Zehaie, Ficre
Registered author(s):

    This thesis focus on three properties of environmental damages: variation across individuals, across sectors and geographical variation. The thesis consists of five articles, two are on long term growth and the environment, two are on international environmental problems and one is on growth and international environmental problems. In Article I it is shown that under the assumption that pollution is a public bad, productivity of pollution has no effect on steady state growth rate. However, if the reach of pollution is limited then pollution is not purely public in character and the productivity of pollution has a positive impact on growth. In Article V population growth's positive and negative effects on pollution are examined. In Article II the strategic aspect of self-protective activities to moderate environmental damages is analyzed. Self-protection is defined as decreasing own environmental damages without changing the level of pollution. Agents can through self-protection make strategic gains by decreasing their cost of abatement and still enjoy high level environmental quality as other agents are induced to increase their abetment. These gains are greatest when agents cooperate on abatement because cooperation leaves more room for strategic behavior to self-protection. In Article III environmental policy of open countries trading polluting goods and polluted eco-services is investigated. Large economies choose strict or lax environmental policies depending on the relative value of eco-services and how this value changes due to changes in environmental policy. For small regional environmental problems where prices are exogenous, it is shown that a country's response to changes of the world price depend on the relative productivity of emissions within the region and the response of other countries. In Article IV we look at a problem when countries concerned with the environment unilaterally abate in foreign countries because of low technological productivity levels in the latter countries and asymmetries in environmental damages. Sweden, financing sewage treatment plants in the baltic region to moderate eutrophication of the Baltic Sea, may be such an example.

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

    File URL: http://pub.epsilon.slu.se/911/
    Download Restriction: no

    Paper provided by Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Economics in its series Department of Economics publications with number 911.

    as
    in new window

    Length:
    Date of creation: Sep 2005
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:sua:ekonwp:911
    Contact details of provider: Postal: Box 7013, 750 07 UPPSALA
    Phone: 018-67 1724
    Fax: 018-67 3502
    Web page: http://www.slu.se/ekonomi

    More information through EDIRC

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

    as in new window
    1. Clas Eriksson & Ficre Zehaie, 2005. "Population Density, Pollution and Growth," Environmental & Resource Economics, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 30(4), pages 465-484, 04.
    2. Murdoch, James C. & Thayer, Mark A., 1990. "The benefits of reducing the incidence of nonmelanoma skin cancers: A defensive expenditures approach," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 18(2), pages 107-119, March.
    3. Ulph, Alistair, 1996. "Environmental Policy and International Trade when Governments and Producers Act Strategically," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 30(3), pages 265-281, May.
    4. Jones, Charles I, 1995. "R&D-Based Models of Economic Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 103(4), pages 759-84, August.
    5. Dionne, G. & Eeckhoudt, L., 1984. "Self-Insurance, Self-Protection and Increased Risk Aversion," Cahiers de recherche 8424, Universite de Montreal, Departement de sciences economiques.
    6. Hoel, Michael, 1991. "Global environmental problems: The effects of unilateral actions taken by one country," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 20(1), pages 55-70, January.
    7. Wolfgang Buchholz & Kai Konrad, 1994. "Global environmental problems and the strategic choice of technology," Journal of Economics, Springer, vol. 60(3), pages 299-321, October.
    8. repec:cup:cbooks:9780521322249 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. John Stranlund, 1996. "On the strategic potential of technological aid in international environmental relations," Journal of Economics, Springer, vol. 64(1), pages 1-22, February.
    10. Benarroch, Michael & Thille, Henry, 2001. "Transboundary pollution and the gains from trade," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(1), pages 139-159, October.
    11. Copeland, Brian R., 1990. "Strategic enhancement and destruction of fisheries and the environment in the presence of international externalities," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 19(3), pages 213-226, November.
    12. Aggarwal, Rimjhim M. & Narayan, Tulika A., 2004. "Does inequality lead to greater efficiency in the use of local commons? The role of strategic investments in capacity," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 47(1), pages 163-182, January.
    13. Copeland,B.R. & Taylor,M.S., 2000. "Free trade and global warming : a trade theory view of the Kyoto protocol," Working papers 4, Wisconsin Madison - Social Systems.
    14. Keeler, Emmett & Spence, Michael & Zeckhauser, Richard, 1972. "The optimal control of pollution," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 4(1), pages 19-34, February.
    15. Sandler, Todd & Buchholtz, Wolfgang & Haslbeck, Christian, 1998. "When Does Partial Cooperation Pay?," Staff General Research Papers 1215, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    16. Smulders, J.A. & Gradus, R.H.J.M., 1996. "Pollution abatement and long-term growth," Other publications TiSEM 1ed65010-f4ac-4a1f-84b6-4, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
    17. Lewis, Tracy & Nickerson, David, 1989. "Self-insurance against natural disasters," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 16(3), pages 209-223, May.
    18. Lans Bovenberg, A. & Smulders, Sjak, 1995. "Environmental quality and pollution-augmenting technological change in a two-sector endogenous growth model," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 57(3), pages 369-391, July.
    19. Markusen, James R., 1975. "International externalities and optimal tax structures," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 5(1), pages 15-29, February.
    20. Greaker, Mads, 2003. "Strategic environmental policy; eco-dumping or a green strategy?," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 45(3), pages 692-707, May.
    21. Smulders, J.A. & Gradus, R.H.J.M., 1993. "The trade-off between environmental care and long-term growth : Pollution in three proto-type growth models," Other publications TiSEM f3ec6de7-f996-4ac0-b872-0, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
    22. Giovanni Immordino, 2003. "Looking for a Guide to Protect the Environment: The Development of the Precautionary Principle," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 17(5), pages 629-644, December.
    23. Poul Schou, 2000. "Polluting Non-Renewable Resources and Growth," Environmental & Resource Economics, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 16(2), pages 211-227, June.
    24. Barrett, Scott, 1994. "Self-Enforcing International Environmental Agreements," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 46(0), pages 878-94, Supplemen.
    25. Philippe Michel & Gilles Rotillon, 1995. "Disutility of pollution and endogenous growth," Environmental & Resource Economics, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 6(3), pages 279-300, October.
    26. Stokey, Nancy L, 1998. "Are There Limits to Growth?," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 39(1), pages 1-31, February.
    27. repec:cup:cbooks:9780521311120 is not listed on IDEAS
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:sua:ekonwp:911. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Alejandro Engelmann)

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.