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Women in the Labour Force : How Well is Europe Doing ?

  • Christopher Pissarides

    (Department of Economics)

  • Pietro Garibaldi

    (Collegio Carlo Alberto)

  • Claudia Olivetti
  • Barbara Petrongolo

    (Queen Mary University of London)

  • Etienne Wasmer

Women have made important advances in labour markets. The distinctions between the activities of single and married women are not as sharp as they used to be, and ambition to do well in a job is no longer restricted to men. Have we done enough to exploit the economic potential in our nations’ women and are our labour markets as good towards women as they are towards men? Are women satisfied with their opportunities and outcomes in the labour market? And are other demographic groups benefiting or hurt from the competition for jobs from more women? (...).

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Paper provided by Sciences Po in its series Sciences Po publications with number info:hdl:2441/9081.

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Date of creation: 2005
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Publication status: Published in Women at Work : An Economic Perspective , pp.1-66
Handle: RePEc:spo:wpmain:info:hdl:2441/9081
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.sciencespo.fr/

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  1. Guell, Maia & Petrongolo, Barbara, 2007. "How binding are legal limits? Transitions from temporary to permanent work in Spain," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(2), pages 153-183, April.
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  3. O'Neill, June & Polachek, Solomon, 1993. "Why the Gender Gap in Wages Narrowed in the 1980s," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 11(1), pages 205-28, January.
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  9. Elizabeth M. Caucutt & Nezih Guner & John Knowles, 2002. "Why Do Women Wait? Matching, Wage Inequality, and the Incentives for Fertility Delay," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 5(4), pages 815-855, October.
  10. David Card & Francis Kramarz & Thomas Lemieux, 1996. "Changes in the Relative Structure of Wages and Employment: A Comparison of the United States, Canada, and France," NBER Working Papers 5487, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  11. Alan Blinder & Yoram Weiss, 1974. "Human Capital and Labor Supply: A Synthesis," Working Papers 435, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
  12. Saint-Paul, Gilles, 2000. "The Political Economy of Labour Market Institutions," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198293323.
  13. Raquel Fernandez & Alessandra Fogli & Claudia Olivetti, 2002. "Marrying Your Mom: Preference Transmission and Women's Labor and Education Choices," NBER Working Papers 9234, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  14. Blau, Francine D & Beller, Andrea H, 1992. "Black-White Earnings over the 1970s and 1980s: Gender Differences in Trends," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 74(2), pages 276-86, May.
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