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Anticipation, Learning and Welfare: the Case of Distortionary Taxation

  • Emanuel Gasteiger

    ()

    (Instituto Universitario de Lisboa)

  • Shoujian Zhang

    ()

    (University of St. Andrews)

We study the impact of anticipated fiscal policy changes in a Ramsey economy where agents form long-horizon expectations using adaptive learning. We ex- tend the existing framework by introducing distortionary taxes as well as elastic labour supply, which makes agents' decisions non-predetermined but more realistic. We detect that the dynamic responses to anticipated tax changes under learning have oscillatory behaviour that can be interpreted as self-ful lling waves of optimism and pessimism emerging from systematic forecast errors. Moreover, we demonstrate that these waves can have important implications for the welfare consequences of fiscal reforms.

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Paper provided by Department of Economics, University of St. Andrews in its series Discussion Paper Series, Department of Economics with number 201309.

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Date of creation: 26 Aug 2013
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Handle: RePEc:san:wpecon:1309
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