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The Effects of Government Spending Shocks on Consumption under Optimal Stabilization

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  • Michal Horvath

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Abstract

Economic theory has yet to come up with a general guidance regarding the dynamic effects and welfare implications of shocks to public spending. With the aim to provide a theoretical benchmark, we analyze if a rise in private consumption following an exogenous rise in government spending is a feature of the economy under optimal stabilization in a standard New Keynesian setting augmented for the presence of liquidityconstrained agents and non-separable preferences. Our results provide little evidence in support of a crowding-in effect under ‘timelessly optimal?policy.

Suggested Citation

  • Michal Horvath, 2008. "The Effects of Government Spending Shocks on Consumption under Optimal Stabilization," CDMA Working Paper Series 200805, Centre for Dynamic Macroeconomic Analysis.
  • Handle: RePEc:san:cdmawp:0805
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    File URL: http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/~wwwecon/CDMA/papers/wp0805.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Chen, Quanrun & Dietzenbacher, Erik & Los, Bart & Yang, Cuihong, 2016. "Modeling the short-run effect of fiscal stimuli on GDP: A new semi-closed input–output model," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 58(C), pages 52-63.
    2. Lorenzo Menna & Patrizio Tirelli, 2014. "Limited Asset Market Participation and the Optimal Fiscal and Monetary Policies," Working Papers 284, University of Milano-Bicocca, Department of Economics, revised Oct 2014.
    3. John W. Keating & Isaac K. Kanyama, 2015. "Is sticky price adjustment important for output fluctuations?," Review of Keynesian Economics, Edward Elgar Publishing, vol. 3(3), pages 392-418, July.
    4. Hsu, Minchung & Zhao, Min, 2009. "China’s Business Cycles between 1954 – 2004: Productivity and Fiscal Policy Changes," MPRA Paper 21283, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Consumption; Government Spending; Optimal Monetary and Fiscal Policy; Non-Separable Preferences; Non-Ricardian Agents.;

    JEL classification:

    • E21 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Consumption; Saving; Wealth
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • E61 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Policy Objectives; Policy Designs and Consistency; Policy Coordination
    • E63 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Comparative or Joint Analysis of Fiscal and Monetary Policy; Stabilization; Treasury Policy

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