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The Relationship Between International Equity Market Behaviour and the JSE

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  • Nick Samouilhan

Abstract

This paper investigates empirically the relationship between domestic and international market returns and volatilities, using the London Stock Exchange as the international market proxy. In order to address problems of widely differing bourse composition, the relationships are tested at both the broad bourse index level and the sectoral sub-indices level. The paper finds significant evidence of a positive relationship between foreign returns and domestic returns and, in addition, between foreign volatility and domestic volatility. It is found that, for most sectors, the main association period is during the same concurrent trading day, although there are additional significant lags present in most of the series. Strong evidence is also found that the magnitude of volatility on the JSE and most of its sub-indices reacts far more to negative shocks than it does to positive shocks.

Suggested Citation

  • Nick Samouilhan, 2006. "The Relationship Between International Equity Market Behaviour and the JSE," Working Papers 42, Economic Research Southern Africa.
  • Handle: RePEc:rza:wpaper:42
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    File URL: http://www.econrsa.org/node/67
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    7. David Laibson, 1997. "Golden Eggs and Hyperbolic Discounting," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 112(2), pages 443-478.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Tinashe Harry Dumile Kambadza & Zivanemoyo Chinzara, 2012. "Returns Correlation Structure and Volatility Spillovers Among the Major African Stock Markets," Working Papers 305, Economic Research Southern Africa.
    2. Cheteni, Priviledge, 2016. "Stock market volatility using GARCH models: Evidence from South Africa and China stock markets," MPRA Paper 77355, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Volatility; Market Returns; Financial Interdependence;

    JEL classification:

    • G15 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - International Financial Markets
    • F36 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Financial Aspects of Economic Integration

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