IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Returns Correlation Structure and Volatility Spillovers Among the Major African Stock Markets


  • Tinashe Harry Dumile Kambadza
  • Zivanemoyo Chinzara


The paper analyses the structure of returns comovements and the volatility spillovers among the African stock markets using daily data for the period 2000-2010. We particularly focus on two issues: whether the stock markets of countries with close trading and financial links are more sychronised, and whether the financial crises influences volatility spillovers. Econometric models used include the Factor Analysis (FA), the Vector Autoregressive (VAR) and the GARCH. Our findings suggest that linkages among the African stock markets only exist along regional blocs. South Africa is found to be both the most dominant and most endogenous stock market. Most of the markets exhibit evidence of asymmetry and persistence in volatility. The results also show that it is important to account for structural change in volatility during financial crises when modelling volatility. We outline the investment and policy implications of the findings.

Suggested Citation

  • Tinashe Harry Dumile Kambadza & Zivanemoyo Chinzara, 2012. "Returns Correlation Structure and Volatility Spillovers Among the Major African Stock Markets," Working Papers 305, Economic Research Southern Africa.
  • Handle: RePEc:rza:wpaper:305

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. M. J. Aziakpono & S. Kleimeier & H. Sander, 2012. "Banking market integration in the SADC countries: evidence from interest rate analyses," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(29), pages 3857-3876, October.
    2. Paresh Kumar Narayan & Russell Smyth, 2005. "Cointegration Of Stock Markets Between New Zealand, Australia And The G7 Economies: Searching For Co-Movement Under Structural Change," Australian Economic Papers, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 44(3), pages 231-247, September.
    3. Z. Chinzara & M.J. Aziakpono, 2009. "Dynamic Returns Linkages and Volatility Transmission between South African and World Major Stock Markets," Working Papers 146, Economic Research Southern Africa.
    4. N.Z Mandimika & Z. Chinzara, 2010. "Risk-return tradeoff and the behaviour of volatility on the South African stock market: Evidence from both aggregate and disaggregate data," Working Papers 198, Economic Research Southern Africa.
    5. M Ayhan Kose & Eswar Prasad & Kenneth Rogoff & Shang-Jin Wei, 2009. "Financial Globalization: A Reappraisal," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 56(1), pages 8-62, April.
    6. Z. Chinzara, 2010. "Macroeconomic uncertainty and emerging market stock market volatility: The case for South Africa," Working Papers 187, Economic Research Southern Africa.
    7. Norbert Funke & Faisal Ahmed & Rabah Arezki, 2005. "The Composition of Capital Flows; Is South Africa Different?," IMF Working Papers 05/40, International Monetary Fund.
    8. Nl Samouilhan, 2006. "The Relationship Between International Equity Market Behaviour And The Jse," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 74(2), pages 248-260, June.
    9. Koop, Gary & Pesaran, M. Hashem & Potter, Simon M., 1996. "Impulse response analysis in nonlinear multivariate models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 74(1), pages 119-147, September.
    10. Pretorius, Elna, 2002. "Economic determinants of emerging stock market interdependence," Emerging Markets Review, Elsevier, vol. 3(1), pages 84-105, March.
    11. Koutmos, Gregory & Booth, G Geoffrey, 1995. "Asymmetric volatility transmission in international stock markets," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 14(6), pages 747-762, December.
    12. Paul Alagidede, 2009. "Are African Stock Markets Integrated with the Rest of the World?," The African Finance Journal, Africagrowth Institute, vol. 11(1), pages 37-53.
    13. Pesaran, H. Hashem & Shin, Yongcheol, 1998. "Generalized impulse response analysis in linear multivariate models," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 58(1), pages 17-29, January.
    14. Michael Humavindu & Christos Floros, 2006. "Integration and Volatility Spillovers in African Equity Markets: Evidence from Namibia and South Africa," The African Finance Journal, Africagrowth Institute, vol. 8(2), pages 31-51.
    15. Nick Samouilhan, 2006. "The Relationship Between International Equity Market Behaviour and the JSE," Working Papers 42, Economic Research Southern Africa.
    16. Meric, Ilhan & Ratner, Mitchell & Meric, Gulser, 2008. "Co-movements of sector index returns in the world's major stock markets in bull and bear markets: Portfolio diversification implications," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 17(1), pages 156-177.
    17. Zuliu Hu & Li Li, 1998. "Responses of the Stock Market to Macroeconomic Announcements Across Economic States," IMF Working Papers 98/79, International Monetary Fund.
    18. Paul Kofman & Ian G. Sharpe, 2003. "Using Multiple Imputation in the Analysis of Incomplete Observations in Finance," Journal of Financial Econometrics, Society for Financial Econometrics, vol. 1(2), pages 216-249.
    19. Chowdhury, Abdur R., 1994. "Stock market interdependencies: Evidence from the asian NIEs," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 16(4), pages 629-651.
    20. Tobin, James, 1969. "A General Equilibrium Approach to Monetary Theory," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 1(1), pages 15-29, February.
    21. Gallagher, Liam A. & Taylor, Mark P., 2002. "The stock return-inflation puzzle revisited," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 75(2), pages 147-156, April.
    22. Sims, Christopher A, 1980. "Macroeconomics and Reality," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 48(1), pages 1-48, January.
    23. Li, Baibing & Martin, Elaine B. & Morris, A. Julian, 2002. "On principal component analysis in L1," Computational Statistics & Data Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 40(3), pages 471-474, September.
    24. Abbas Valadkhani & Surachai Chancharat & Charles Harvie, 2008. "A factor analysis of international portfolio diversification," Studies in Economics and Finance, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 25(3), pages 165-174, August.
    25. Berben, Robert-Paul & Jansen, W. Jos, 2005. "Comovement in international equity markets: A sectoral view," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 24(5), pages 832-857, September.
    26. Tsangyao Chang & Chien-Chung Nieh & Ching-Chun Wei, 2006. "Analysis of long-run benefits from international equity diversification between Taiwan and its major European trading partners: an empirical note," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(19), pages 2277-2283.
    27. D. Collins & N. Biekpe, 2003. "Contagion And Interdependence In African Stock Markets," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 71(1), pages 181-194, March.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Guney, Yilmaz & Kallinterakis, Vasileios & Komba, Gabriel, 2017. "Herding in frontier markets: Evidence from African stock exchanges," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 152-175.

    More about this item


    Returns and volatility linkages; Factor Analysis (FA); Vector Autoregressive (VAR); Financial Stability; asymmetric GARCH.;

    JEL classification:

    • G15 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - International Financial Markets
    • F36 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Financial Aspects of Economic Integration

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:rza:wpaper:305. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Charles Tanton). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.