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Husband’s Unemployment and Wife’s Labor Supply – The Added Worker Effect across Europe

  • Julia Bredtmann

    ()

  • Sebastian Otten
  • Christian Rulff

This paper investigates the responsiveness of women’s labor supply to their husband’s loss of employment – the so-called added worker effect. While previous empirical literature on this topic mainly concentrates on a single country, we take an explicit internationally comparative perspective and analyze whether the added worker effect varies across the European countries.

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File URL: http://repec.rwi-essen.de/files/REP_14_484.pdf
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Paper provided by Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universität Dortmund, Universität Duisburg-Essen in its series Ruhr Economic Papers with number 0484.

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Length: 47 pages
Date of creation: May 2014
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:rwi:repape:0484
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  1. Lundberg, Shelly, 1985. "The Added Worker Effect," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 3(1), pages 11-37, January.
  2. Bryan, Mark L. & Longhi, Simonetta, 2013. "Couples' Labour Supply Responses to Job Loss: Boom and Recession Compared," IZA Discussion Papers 7775, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  3. Orazio Attanasio & Hamish Low & Virginia Sánchez-Marcos, 2005. "Female Labor Supply As Insurance Against Idiosyncratic Risk," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 3(2-3), pages 755-764, 04/05.
  4. Melvin Stephens, 2002. "Worker Displacement and the Added Worker Effect," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 20(3), pages 504-537, July.
  5. Michael C. Burda & Jennifer Hunt, 2011. "What Explains the German Labor Market Miracle in the Great Recession?," SFB 649 Discussion Papers SFB649DP2011-031, Sonderforschungsbereich 649, Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany.
  6. Salvador Ortigueira & Nawid Siassi, 2011. "How important is intra-household risk sharing for savings and labor supply?," Economics Working Papers we1132, Universidad Carlos III, Departamento de Economía.
  7. Xiaodong Gong, 2011. "The Added Worker Effect for Married Women in Australia," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 87(278), pages 414-426, 09.
  8. Cem Baslevent & Ozlem Onaran, 2003. "Are Married Women in Turkey More Likely to Become Added or Discouraged Workers?," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 17(3), pages 439-458, 09.
  9. Susan Parker & Emmanuel Skoufias, 2004. "The added worker effect over the business cycle: evidence from urban Mexico," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(10), pages 625-630.
  10. Spletzer, James R, 1997. "Reexamining the Added Worker Effect," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 35(2), pages 417-27, April.
  11. Kell, Michael & Wright, Jane, 1990. "Benefits and the Labour Supply of Women Married to Unemployed Men," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 100(400), pages 119-26, Supplemen.
  12. Miki Kohara, 2010. "The response of Japanese wives’ labor supply to husbands’ job loss," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 23(4), pages 1133-1149, September.
  13. Tim Maloney, 1987. "Employment Constraints and the Labor Supply of Married Women: A Reexamination of the Added Worker Effect," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 22(1), pages 51-61.
  14. Cullen, Julie Berry & Gruber, Jonathan, 2000. "Does Unemployment Insurance Crowd Out Spousal Labor Supply?," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 18(3), pages 546-72, July.
  15. James X. Sullivan, 2005. "Borrowing during unemployment: unsecured debt as a safety net," Proceedings 958, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
  16. repec:ese:iserwp:2013-20 is not listed on IDEAS
  17. Juan Prieto-Rodriguez & Cesar Rodriguez-Gutierrez, 2000. "The added worker effect in the Spanish case," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(15), pages 1917-1925.
  18. Richard Blundell & Antoine Bozio & Guy Laroque, 2011. "Labor Supply and the Extensive Margin," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(3), pages 482-86, May.
  19. Samuel Bentolila & Andrea Ichino, 2008. "Unemployment and consumption near and far away from the Mediterranean," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 21(2), pages 255-280, April.
  20. Heckman, James J & Macurdy, Thomas E, 1980. "A Life Cycle Model of Female Labour Supply," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 47(1), pages 47-74, January.
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