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High-Impact Minimum Wages and Heterogeneous Regions

  • Philipp vom Berge
  • Hanna Frings

    ()

  • Alfredo R. Paloyo

We estimate the effects on wage and employment growth rates of the introduction and subsequent increases of a substantial minimum wage in the main construction industry of Germany. Using a regional dataset constructed from individual employment histories, we exploit the spatial dimension and border discontinuities of the regional data to account for spillovers between districts and unobserved heterogeneity at the local level. The results indicate that the minimum wage increased the wage growth rate for East Germany but did not have a significant impact on the West German equivalent. The estimated eff ect on the employment growth rate reveals a contraction in the East of about 2.6 to 3.1 percentage points for a one-standard-deviation increase in the minimum-wage bite, amounting to roughly half of the overall decline in the growth rate, but no significant change is observed for the West.

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Paper provided by Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universität Dortmund, Universität Duisburg-Essen in its series Ruhr Economic Papers with number 0408.

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Length: 39 pages
Date of creation: Mar 2013
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:rwi:repape:0408
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  1. Thomas K. Bauer & Jochen Kluve & Sandra Schaffner & Christoph M. Schmidt, 2009. "Fiscal Effects of Minimum Wages: An Analysis for Germany," German Economic Review, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 10, pages 224-242, 05.
  2. Marion König & Joachim Möller, 2009. "Impacts of minimum wages: a microdata analysis for the German construction sector," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 30(7), pages 716-741, November.
  3. Thiess Büttner & Alexander Ebertz, 2009. "Spatial Implications of Minimum Wages," Ifo Working Paper Series Ifo Working Paper No. 66, Ifo Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich.
  4. Dube, Andrajit & Lester, T. William & Reich, Michael, 2010. "Minimum Wage Effects Across State Borders: Estimates Using Contiguous Counties," Institute for Research on Labor and Employment, Working Paper Series qt86w5m90m, Institute of Industrial Relations, UC Berkeley.
  5. Paulo Guimarães & Pedro Portugal, 2009. "A Simple Feasible Alternative Procedure to Estimate Models with High-Dimensional Fixed Effects," Working Papers w200909, Banco de Portugal, Economics and Research Department.
  6. Bachmann, Ronald & König, Marion & Schaffner, Sandra, 2012. "Lost in Transition? Minimum Wage Effects on German Construction Workers," IZA Discussion Papers 6760, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  7. Bachmann, Ronald & Bauer, Thomas K. & Kroeger, Hanna, 2012. "Minimum Wages as a Barrier to Entry: Evidence from Germany," IZA Discussion Papers 6484, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  8. Charlene Kalenkoski & Donald Lacombe, 2011. "Minimum Wages and Teen Employment: A Spatial Panel Approach," Working Papers Working Paper 2011-08, Regional Research Institute, West Virginia University.
  9. Whaples Robert, 2006. "Do Economists Agree on Anything? Yes!," The Economists' Voice, De Gruyter, vol. 3(9), pages 1-6, November.
  10. David Neumark & J. M. Ian Salas & William Wascher, 2014. "Revisiting the Minimum Wage–Employment Debate: Throwing Out the Baby with the Bathwater?," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 67(2.5), pages 608-648, May.
  11. William Brown, 2009. "The Process of Fixing the British National Minimum Wage, 1997-2007," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 47(2), pages 429-443, 06.
  12. Joseph J. Sabia & Richard V. Burkhauser, 2010. "Minimum Wages and Poverty: Will a $9.50 Federal Minimum Wage Really Help the Working Poor?," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 76(3), pages 592-623, January.
  13. Allegretto, Sylvia & Dube, Arindrajit & Reich, Michael, 2010. "Do Minimum Wages Really Reduce Teen Employment? Accounting for Heterogeneity and Selectivity in State Panel Data," Institute for Research on Labor and Employment, Working Paper Series qt7jq2q3j8, Institute of Industrial Relations, UC Berkeley.
  14. David Neumark & William L. Wascher, 2008. "Minimum Wages," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262141027, June.
  15. J. Barkley Rosser, 2009. "Introduction," Chapters, in: Handbook of Research on Complexity, chapter 1 Edward Elgar.
  16. Machin, Stephen & Manning, Alan, 1997. "Minimum wages and economic outcomes in Europe," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 41(3-5), pages 733-742, April.
  17. Paulo Guimarães & Pedro Portugal, 2010. "A simple feasible procedure to fit models with high-dimensional fixed effects," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, vol. 10(4), pages 628-649, December.
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