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Multigenerational Living Arrangements among Migrants

  • Regina Flake

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    There is a significantly higher prevalence of multigenerational living arrangements among migrants than among natives in Germany which may be explained with migrants choosing this household structure in order to compensate for economic disadvantages. This hypothesis is tested by analyzing the economic conditions within multigenerational households. The results show that in multigenerational migrant households, more groups contribute significantly to the household income than in comparable native households – in particular in households below the at-risk-of-poverty line. On the individual level, the results reveal that migrant children in multigenerational households have lower labor force participation rates than native children or migrant children in other household types. Therefore, this study provides evidence for a correlation between multigenerational cohabitation and economic conditions among migrants.

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    File URL: http://repec.rwi-essen.de/files/REP_12_366.pdf
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    Paper provided by Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universität Dortmund, Universität Duisburg-Essen in its series Ruhr Economic Papers with number 0366.

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    Length: 37 pages
    Date of creation: Sep 2012
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:rwi:repape:0366
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    1. Gil Epstein & Ira Gang, 2010. "Migration and Culture," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1020, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
    2. Omer Moav, 2005. "Cheap Children and the Persistence of Poverty," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 115(500), pages 88-110, 01.
    3. John P. Haisken-DeNew & Markus H. Hahn, 2010. "PanelWhiz: Efficient Data Extraction of Complex Panel Data Sets - An Example Using the German SOEP," Schmollers Jahrbuch : Journal of Applied Social Science Studies / Zeitschrift für Wirtschafts- und Sozialwissenschaften, Duncker & Humblot, Berlin, vol. 130(4), pages 643-654.
    4. Yann Algan & Christian Dustmann & Albrecht Glitz & Alan Manning, 2009. "The Economic Situation of First- and Second-Generation Immigrants in France, Germany and the United Kingdom," CEP Discussion Papers dp0951, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    5. Rosenzweig, Mark R & Wolpin, Kenneth I, 1993. "Intergenerational Support and the Life-Cycle Incomes of Young Men and Their Parents: Human Capital Investments, Coresidence, and Intergenerational Financial Transfers," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 11(1), pages 84-112, January.
    6. Markus M. Grabka, 2010. "Codebook for the $PEQUIV File 1984-2009: CNEF Variables with Extended Income Information for the SOEP," Data Documentation 49, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    7. Cobb-Clark, Deborah A., 2008. "Leaving Home: What Economics Has to Say about the Living Arrangements of Young Australians," IZA Discussion Papers 3309, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    8. Peichl, Andreas & Pestel, Nico & Schneider, Hilmar, 2010. "Does Size Matter? The Impact of Changes in Household Structure on Income Distribution in Germany," IZA Discussion Papers 4770, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    9. Gert G. Wagner & Joachim R. Frick & Jürgen Schupp, 2007. "The German Socio-Economic Panel Study (SOEP) – Scope, Evolution and Enhancements," Schmollers Jahrbuch : Journal of Applied Social Science Studies / Zeitschrift für Wirtschafts- und Sozialwissenschaften, Duncker & Humblot, Berlin, vol. 127(1), pages 139-169.
    10. Jennifer Hook & Jennifer Glick, 2007. "Immigration and living arrangements: Moving beyond economic need versus acculturation," Demography, Springer, vol. 44(2), pages 225-249, May.
    11. Eric V. Edmonds & Kristin Mammen & Douglas L. Miller, 2005. "Rearranging the Family?: Income Support and Elderly Living Arrangements in a Low-Income Country," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 40(1).
    12. Paola Giuliano, 2007. "Living Arrangements in Western Europe: Does Cultural Origin Matter?," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 5(5), pages 927-952, 09.
    13. Marco Manacorda & Enrico Moretti, 2006. "Why do Most Italian Youths Live with Their Parents? Intergenerational Transfers and Household Structure," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 4(4), pages 800-829, 06.
    14. Thomas Liebig, 2007. "The Labour Market Integration of Immigrants in Germany," OECD Social, Employment and Migration Working Papers 47, OECD Publishing.
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