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Foreign Direct Investment and Labor Rights: A Panel Analysis of Bilateral FDI Flows

Author

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  • Matthias Busse
  • Peter Nunnenkamp
  • Mariana Spatareanu

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Abstract

The paper analyses the impact of fundamental labor rights on bilateral FDI flows to 82 developing countries. The results indicate that investments by multinationals are significantly higher in countries that adhere to labor rights, thereby refuting the hypothesis that repression of these rights fosters FDI.

Suggested Citation

  • Matthias Busse & Peter Nunnenkamp & Mariana Spatareanu, 2010. "Foreign Direct Investment and Labor Rights: A Panel Analysis of Bilateral FDI Flows," Working Papers Rutgers University, Newark 2010-002, Department of Economics, Rutgers University, Newark.
  • Handle: RePEc:run:wpaper:2010-002
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    File URL: http://www.ncas.rutgers.edu/department-economics/workingpaper20102
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Philipp Harms & Heinrich W. Ursprung, 2002. "Do Civil and Political Repression Really Boost Foreign Direct Investments?," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 40(4), pages 651-663, October.
    2. Neumayer, Eric & Soysa, Indra de, 2006. "Globalization and the Right to Free Association and Collective Bargaining: An Empirical Analysis," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 34(1), pages 31-49, January.
    3. Beata Smarzynska Javorcik & Mariana Spatareanu, 2005. "Do Foreign Investors Care about Labor Market Regulations?," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 141(3), pages 375-403, October.
    4. Leahy, Dermot & Montagna, Catia, 2000. "Unionisation and Foreign Direct Investment: Challenging Conventional Wisdom?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 110(462), pages 80-92, March.
    5. Blundell, Richard & Bond, Stephen, 1998. "Initial conditions and moment restrictions in dynamic panel data models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 87(1), pages 115-143, August.
    6. Jan I. Haaland & Ian Wooton & Giulia Faggio, 2002. "Multinational Firms: Easy Come, Easy Go?," FinanzArchiv: Public Finance Analysis, Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen, vol. 59(1), pages 1-3, February.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Hanousek, Jan & Kocenda, Evzen & Maurel, Mathilde, 2011. "Direct and indirect effects of FDI in emerging European markets: A survey and meta-analysis," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 35(3), pages 301-322, September.
    2. Rosete, Alfredo, 2015. "Expropriation and the Location of Farmland Investment: a theoretical investigation into the Land Rush," UMASS Amherst Economics Working Papers 2015-17, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Department of Economics.
    3. Häberli, Christian. & Jansen, Marion. & Monteiro, José-Antonio., 2012. "Regional trade agreements and domestic labour market regulation," ILO Working Papers 994700163402676, International Labour Organization.
    4. Jayjit Roy, 2016. "Employment Protection Legislation and International Trade," Working Papers 16-06, Department of Economics, Appalachian State University.
    5. Konstantin M. Wacker & Krishna Chaitanya Vadlamannati, 2011. "Do Multinationals Influence Labor Standards? A Close Look at US Outward FDI," Courant Research Centre: Poverty, Equity and Growth - Discussion Papers 98, Courant Research Centre PEG.
    6. Hawkes, Denise Donna & Yerrabati, Sridevi, 2015. "Institutions and investment in South and East Asia & Pacific region: Evidence from meta-analysis," Economics Discussion Papers 2015-62, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    7. David Kucera & Marco Principi, 2014. "Democracy and foreign direct investment at the industry level: evidence for US multinationals," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 150(3), pages 595-617, August.
    8. repec:taf:oaefxx:v:5:y:2017:i:1:p:1273588 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    FDI; Labor Rights; Developing Countries;

    JEL classification:

    • F21 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Investment; Long-Term Capital Movements
    • F23 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Multinational Firms; International Business
    • J50 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor-Management Relations, Trade Unions, and Collective Bargaining - - - General

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