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Black-White Appreciation of Owner Occupied Homes in Upper Income Suburban Integrated Communities: The Cases of Maplewood and Montclair, New Jersey

  • Douglas Coate

    ()

  • Richard Schwester

    ()

The purpose of this paper is to examine black-white differences in housing appreciation in northern New Jersey, with particular emphasis on the communities of Montclair and Maplewood in the 1970 to 2000 period. We find that home appreciation at the block group level in these communities was inversely related to changes in the black population. The effect of changes in the proportion of the population that was black on home appreciation was similar to the effects of changes in black population at the census tract level in the northern New Jersey region as a whole. These high income communities with award winning school districts and well maintained housing stocks were not immune from the effects of race on home appreciation.

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File URL: http://www.ncas.rutgers.edu/workingpaper20081
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Paper provided by Department of Economics, Rutgers University, Newark in its series Working Papers Rutgers University, Newark with number 2008-001.

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Length: 18 pages
Date of creation: Jan 2008
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:run:wpaper:2008-001
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Web page: http://www.ncas.rutgers.edu/economics

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  1. Patrick Bajari & Matthew E. Kahn, . "Why Do Blacks Live in The Cities and Whites Live in the Suburbs?," Working Papers 00007, Stanford University, Department of Economics.
  2. Macpherson, David A & Sirmans, G Stacy, 2001. "Neighborhood Diversity and House-Price Appreciation," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 22(1), pages 81-97, January.
  3. Robert Barsky & John Bound & Kerwin Charles & Joseph Lupton, 2001. "Accounting for the Black-White Wealth Gap: A Nonparametric Approach," NBER Working Papers 8466, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Michael Devaney & William Rayburn, 1993. "Neighborhood Racial Transition and Housing Returns: A Portfolio Approach," Journal of Real Estate Research, American Real Estate Society, vol. 8(2), pages 239-252.
  5. Sunwoong Kim, 2000. "Race and home price appreciation in urban neighborhoods: Evidence from Milwaukee, Wisconsin," The Review of Black Political Economy, Springer, vol. 28(2), pages 9-28, December.
  6. Katherine A. Kiel & Richard T. Carson, 1990. "An Examination of Systematic Differences in the Appreciation of Individual Housing Units," Journal of Real Estate Research, American Real Estate Society, vol. 5(3), pages 301-318.
  7. Coate, Douglas & Vanderhoff, James, 1993. "Race of the Homeowner and Appreciation of Single-Family Homes in the United States," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 7(3), pages 205-12, November.
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