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Corporate Social Responsibility: International Perspectives

Author

Listed:
  • Abagail McWilliams

    () (College of Business Administration, University of Illinois at Chicago, 601 South Morgan Street, Chicago, IL 60607-7123, United States)

  • Donald S. Siegel

    () (Department of Economics, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY 12180-3590, USA)

  • Patrick M. Wright

    () (School of Industrial and Labor Relations Cornell University, 393 Ives Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853-3901, United States)

Abstract

In this introduction to the special issue, we provide a brief review of the CSR literature with attention to some of the difficulties in globalizing the existing CSR concepts. Following this we provide a brief summary of each of the four papers that comprise the special issue, with emphasis on the unique contribution of each.

Suggested Citation

  • Abagail McWilliams & Donald S. Siegel & Patrick M. Wright, 2006. "Corporate Social Responsibility: International Perspectives," Rensselaer Working Papers in Economics 0604, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:rpi:rpiwpe:0604
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    File URL: http://www.economics.rpi.edu/workingpapers/rpi0604.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Teoh, Siew Hong & Welch, Ivo & Wazzan, C Paul, 1999. "The Effect of Socially Activist Investment Policies on the Financial Markets: Evidence from the South African Boycott," The Journal of Business, University of Chicago Press, vol. 72(1), pages 35-89, January.
    2. Judith F. Posnikoff, 1997. "Disinvestment From South Africa: They Did Well By Doing Good," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 15(1), pages 76-86, January.
    3. Baron, David P., 2001. "Private Politics," Research Papers 1689, Stanford University, Graduate School of Business.
    4. Catherine M. Paul & Donald Siegel, 2006. "Corporate social responsibility and economic performance," Journal of Productivity Analysis, Springer, vol. 26(3), pages 207-211, December.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Stefan Ambec & Paul Lanoie, 2007. "When and Why Does It Pay To Be Green?," CIRANO Working Papers 2007s-20, CIRANO.
    2. Leppänen, Simo & Linden, Mikael & Solanko, Laura, 2009. "Firm behavior under production uncertainty : Evidence from Russia," BOFIT Discussion Papers 16/2009, Bank of Finland, Institute for Economies in Transition.
    3. Martínez Ros, Ester & Kunapatarawong, Rasi, 2013. "Influences of institutional pressures on corporate social responsibility attitude and corporate social responsibility outcomes," DEE - Working Papers. Business Economics. WB wb130301, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Departamento de Economía de la Empresa.
    4. Amir Barnea & Amir Rubin, 2010. "Corporate Social Responsibility as a Conflict Between Shareholders," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 97(1), pages 71-86, November.
    5. Lundgren, Tommy & Olsson, Rickard, 2008. "How Bad is Bad News? Assessing the Effects of Environmental Incidents on Firm Value," Sustainable Investment and Corporate Governance Working Papers 2008/1, Sustainable Investment Research Platform.
    6. Eric J. Levin & Robert E. Wright, 2002. "Estimating the price elasticity of demand in the London stock market," The European Journal of Finance, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 8(2), pages 222-237, June.
    7. Constantin Belu, 2009. "Ranking corporations based on sustainable and socially responsible practices. A data envelopment analysis (DEA) approach," Sustainable Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 17(4), pages 257-268.
    8. Peter Rodriguez & Donald S Siegel & Amy Hillman & Lorraine Eden, 2006. "Three lenses on the multinational enterprise: politics, corruption, and corporate social responsibility," Journal of International Business Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Academy of International Business, vol. 37(6), pages 733-746, November.
    9. Magdalena Öberseder & Bodo Schlegelmilch & Verena Gruber, 2011. "“Why Don’t Consumers Care About CSR?”: A Qualitative Study Exploring the Role of CSR in Consumption Decisions," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 104(4), pages 449-460, December.
    10. Matthias Ehrgott & Felix Reimann & Lutz Kaufmann & Craig Carter, 2011. "Social Sustainability in Selecting Emerging Economy Suppliers," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 98(1), pages 99-119, January.
    11. Detre, Joshua D. & Gunderson, Michael A., 2011. "The Triple Bottom Line: What is the Impact on the Returns to Agribusiness?," International Food and Agribusiness Management Review, International Food and Agribusiness Management Association (IFAMA), vol. 14(4).
    12. Abagail McWilliams & Donald S. Siegel & Patrick M. Wright, 2006. "Corporate Social Responsibility: Strategic Implications," Journal of Management Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 43(1), pages 1-18, January.
    13. Ran Zhang & Jigao Zhu & Heng Yue & Chunyan Zhu, 2010. "Corporate Philanthropic Giving, Advertising Intensity, and Industry Competition Level," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 94(1), pages 39-52, June.
    14. Hans De Geer & Tommy Borglund & Magnus Frostenson, 2009. "Reconciling CSR with the Role of the Corporation in Welfare States: The Problematic Swedish Example," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 89(3), pages 269-283, November.
    15. Sylvia Maxfield, 2008. "Reconciling Corporate Citizenship and Competitive Strategy: Insights from Economic Theory," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 80(2), pages 367-377, June.
    16. Rekker, Saphira A.C. & Benson, Karen L. & Faff, Robert W., 2014. "Corporate social responsibility and CEO compensation revisited: Do disaggregation, market stress, gender matter?," Journal of Economics and Business, Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 84-103.
    17. Jeremy Moon & Xi Shen, 2010. "CSR in China Research: Salience, Focus and Nature," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 94(4), pages 613-629, July.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • L15 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Information and Product Quality
    • L21 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - Business Objectives of the Firm
    • M14 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Business Administration - - - Corporate Culture; Diversity; Social Responsibility

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