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Shifting Trade Patterns as a Means to Reduce Global CO2 Emissions: Implications for the Aluminium Industry

Author

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  • Anders Hammer Strømman

    (Norwegian University of Science & Technology Department of Energy and Process Technology, Industrial Ecology Program H¿yskoleringen 5, 7491 Trondheim, Norway)

  • Edgar G. Hertwich

    (Norwegian University of Science & Technology Department of Energy and Process Technology, Industrial Ecology Program Høyskoleringen 5, 7491 Trondheim, Norway)

  • Faye Duchin

    () (Department of Economics, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy NY 12180-3590, USA)

Abstract

This paper investigates how changes in the international division of labor can contribute to reducing CO2 emissions. The mitigation potential and costs implied by this mechanism are analyzed. Implications for the aluminium sector are assessed, including changes in the price of aluminium when global carbon emissions are constrained and the constraints are progressively tightened. The analysis makes use of the World Trade Model with Bilateral Trade (WTMBT), a linear program based on comparative advantage with any number of goods, factors, and regional trade partners. Minimizing factor use, WTMBT determines regional production, bilateral trade patterns, and region-specific prices. The model is extended for this study through the application of multi-objective optimization techniques and is used to explore efficient trade-offs between reducing CO2 emissions and increasing global factor costs. This application demonstrates how the WTMBT, with its global scope and regional and sectoral production detail, can be used to build bridges between global objectives and concerns about a specific industry in specific regions. This capability can extend the reach of more traditional studies in industrial ecology.

Suggested Citation

  • Anders Hammer Strømman & Edgar G. Hertwich & Faye Duchin, 2005. "Shifting Trade Patterns as a Means to Reduce Global CO2 Emissions: Implications for the Aluminium Industry," Rensselaer Working Papers in Economics 0508, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:rpi:rpiwpe:0508
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    File URL: http://www.economics.rpi.edu/workingpapers/rpi0508.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Anders Hammer Strømman & Faye Duchin, 2006. "A world trade model with bilateral trade based on comparative advantage," Economic Systems Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(3), pages 281-297.
    2. Dantzig, George B, 1976. "On the Reduction of an Integrated Energy and Interindustry Model to a Smaller Linear Program," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 58(2), pages 248-250, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Lining He & Faye Duchin, 2009. "Regional Development In China: Interregional Transportation Infrastructure And Regional Comparative Advantage," Economic Systems Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 21(1), pages 3-22.
    2. Anders Hammer Strømman & Faye Duchin, 2006. "A world trade model with bilateral trade based on comparative advantage," Economic Systems Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(3), pages 281-297.
    3. Faye Duchin, 2007. "Energy and the Global Economy," Rensselaer Working Papers in Economics 0704, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Department of Economics.
    4. Wiedmann, Thomas & Lenzen, Manfred & Turner, Karen & Barrett, John, 2007. "Examining the global environmental impact of regional consumption activities -- Part 2: Review of input-output models for the assessment of environmental impacts embodied in trade," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 61(1), pages 15-26, February.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • F18 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade and Environment
    • C61 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Optimization Techniques; Programming Models; Dynamic Analysis
    • C67 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Input-Output Models
    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth

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