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Socioeconomic Success and Health in Later Life Evidence from the Indonesia Family Life Survey

Author

Listed:
  • Firman Witoelar
  • John Strauss
  • Bondan Sikoki

Abstract

Indonesia has been undergoing a major health and nutrition transition over the past twenty or more years and there has begun a significant aging of the population as well. In this paper the authors focus on documenting major changes in the health of the population aged 45 years and older, since 1993. They use the Indonesia Family Life Survey (IFLS), a large-scale, broad-based panel survey of households and individuals, covering 4 full waves from 1993 to 2007/8. Much of the changes can be seen as improvements in health, such as the movement out of undernutrition and communicable disease as well as the increasing levels of hemoglobin. On the other hand, other changes such as the increase in overweight and waist circumference, especially among women, and continuing high levels of hypertension that seems to be inadequately addressed by the health system, indicate that the elderly population in Indonesia is increasingly exposed to higher risk factors that are correlated with chronic problems such as cardiovascular diseases and diabetes. In addition to documenting long-run changes in health and its distribution among the elderly Indonesian population, they examine correlations between socio-economic status, principally education and percapita expenditure, and numerous health outcome and behavioral variables.

Suggested Citation

  • Firman Witoelar & John Strauss & Bondan Sikoki, 2009. "Socioeconomic Success and Health in Later Life Evidence from the Indonesia Family Life Survey," Working Papers 704, RAND Corporation.
  • Handle: RePEc:ran:wpaper:704
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    Cited by:

    1. Lei, Xiaoyan & Sun, Xiaoting & Strauss, John & Zhang, Peng & Zhao, Yaohui, 2014. "Depressive symptoms and SES among the mid-aged and elderly in China: Evidence from the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study national baseline," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, pages 224-232.
    2. Claude Berrebi & Jordan Ostwald, 2011. "Earthquakes, hurricanes, and terrorism: do natural disasters incite terror?," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 149(3), pages 383-403, December.
    3. repec:eee:joecag:v:6:y:2015:i:c:p:44-56 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Strauss, John & Lei, Xiaoyan & Park, Albert & Shen, Yan & Smith, James P. & Yang, Zhe & Zhao, Yaohui, 2010. "Health Outcomes and Socio-Economic Status among the Elderly in China: Evidence from the CHARLS Pilot," IZA Discussion Papers 5152, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Lei, Xiaoyan & Yin, Nina & Zhao, Yaohui, 2012. "Socioeconomic status and chronic diseases: The case of hypertension in China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, pages 105-121.
    6. Lei, Xiaoyan & Yin, Nina & Zhao, Yaohui, 2010. "SES Health Gradients during the Epidemiological Transition: The Case of China," IZA Discussion Papers 4914, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. Xiaoyan Lei & Nina Yin & Yaohui Zhao, 2010. "SES Health Gradients during the Epidemiological Transition : The Case of China," Development Economics Working Papers 22719, East Asian Bureau of Economic Research.
    8. Younoh Kim, 2015. "Hypertension dynamics in the elderly population," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, pages 528-539.
    9. Elizabeth Frankenberg & Jessica Y. Ho & Duncan Thomas, 2015. "Biological Health Risks and Economic Development," NBER Working Papers 21277, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. repec:ran:wpaper:774 is not listed on IDEAS

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